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Death causes in breast cancer patients

Riihimaeki, M.; Thomsen, H.; Brandt, A.; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2012) In Annals of Oncology 23(3). p.604-604
Abstract
Background: Due to improved outcomes in breast cancer (BCa), the proportion of affected women dying of other causes has increased. Thus, a better survival of BCa requires knowledge of other causes of death. Materials and methods: Data on the population, cancers, and causes of death were gathered from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database, enrolling similar to 3.68 million Swedish women. A Cox regression model, comparing BCa patients against all other women, was applied. Cause-of-death-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for both underlying and multiple causes of death. Results: Among 641 000 deaths from 1987 to 2006, 48 000 were BCa patients. For underlying causes except BCa, the highest cause-specific HRs were found for... (More)
Background: Due to improved outcomes in breast cancer (BCa), the proportion of affected women dying of other causes has increased. Thus, a better survival of BCa requires knowledge of other causes of death. Materials and methods: Data on the population, cancers, and causes of death were gathered from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database, enrolling similar to 3.68 million Swedish women. A Cox regression model, comparing BCa patients against all other women, was applied. Cause-of-death-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for both underlying and multiple causes of death. Results: Among 641 000 deaths from 1987 to 2006, 48 000 were BCa patients. For underlying causes except BCa, the highest cause-specific HRs were found for diseases of pulmonary circulation {1.51 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.68]}, suicide [1.39 (1.19-1.63)], and heart failure [1.29 (1.22-1.37)]. For specific multiple causes, the highest ratios were found for external causes [1.86 (1.80-1.91)] and gastrointestinal disease [1.68 (1.62-1.74)]. Conclusions: Diagnosis of BCa is associated with increased risks of dying of various causes, including external causes, heart failure, diseases of pulmonary circulation, and gastrointestinal disease. The study fulfills the gap in knowledge of death causes in BCa patients and suggests to draw more attention to comorbidities. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
breast cancer, cause of death, comorbidity, regression analysis
in
Annals of Oncology
volume
23
issue
3
pages
604 - 604
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000300733300010
  • scopus:84856218660
ISSN
1569-8041
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdr160
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
afd17372-47e7-404e-bca4-969dfac197e8 (old id 2494877)
date added to LUP
2012-05-07 14:20:47
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:06:44
@article{afd17372-47e7-404e-bca4-969dfac197e8,
  abstract     = {Background: Due to improved outcomes in breast cancer (BCa), the proportion of affected women dying of other causes has increased. Thus, a better survival of BCa requires knowledge of other causes of death. Materials and methods: Data on the population, cancers, and causes of death were gathered from the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database, enrolling similar to 3.68 million Swedish women. A Cox regression model, comparing BCa patients against all other women, was applied. Cause-of-death-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for both underlying and multiple causes of death. Results: Among 641 000 deaths from 1987 to 2006, 48 000 were BCa patients. For underlying causes except BCa, the highest cause-specific HRs were found for diseases of pulmonary circulation {1.51 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.68]}, suicide [1.39 (1.19-1.63)], and heart failure [1.29 (1.22-1.37)]. For specific multiple causes, the highest ratios were found for external causes [1.86 (1.80-1.91)] and gastrointestinal disease [1.68 (1.62-1.74)]. Conclusions: Diagnosis of BCa is associated with increased risks of dying of various causes, including external causes, heart failure, diseases of pulmonary circulation, and gastrointestinal disease. The study fulfills the gap in knowledge of death causes in BCa patients and suggests to draw more attention to comorbidities.},
  author       = {Riihimaeki, M. and Thomsen, H. and Brandt, A. and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1569-8041},
  keyword      = {breast cancer,cause of death,comorbidity,regression analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {604--604},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Oncology},
  title        = {Death causes in breast cancer patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdr160},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2012},
}