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Influence of Innovative Processing on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Contents in Plant Food Materials

Poojary, Mahesha M.; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Roohinejad, Shahin; Koubaa, Mohamed; Tylewicz, Urszula; Galindo, Federico Gómez LU ; Saraiva, Jorge A.; Rosa, Marco Dalla and Barba, Francisco J. (2017) In Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety
Abstract

Over the last several decades, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has attracted much attention due to its diverse physiological implications in plants, animals, and microorganisms. GABA naturally occurs in plant materials and its concentrations may vary considerably, from traces up to μmol/g (dry basis) depending on plant matrix, germination stage, and processing conditions, among other factors. However, due to its important biological activities, considerable interest has been shown by both food and pharmaceutical industries to improve its concentration in plants. Natural and conventional treatments such as mechanical and cold stimulation, anoxia, germination, enzyme treatment, adding exogenous glutamic acid (Glu) or gibberellins, and... (More)

Over the last several decades, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has attracted much attention due to its diverse physiological implications in plants, animals, and microorganisms. GABA naturally occurs in plant materials and its concentrations may vary considerably, from traces up to μmol/g (dry basis) depending on plant matrix, germination stage, and processing conditions, among other factors. However, due to its important biological activities, considerable interest has been shown by both food and pharmaceutical industries to improve its concentration in plants. Natural and conventional treatments such as mechanical and cold stimulation, anoxia, germination, enzyme treatment, adding exogenous glutamic acid (Glu) or gibberellins, and bacterial fermentation have been shown effective to increase the GABA concentration in several plant materials. However, some of these treatments can modify the nutritional, organoleptic, and/or functional properties of plants. Recent consumer demand for food products which are "healthy," safe and, having added benefits (nutraceuticals/functional components) has led to explore new ways to improve the content of bioactive compounds while maintaining desirable organoleptic and physicochemical properties. Along this line, nonthermal processing technologies (such as high-pressure processing, pulsed electric fields, and ultrasound, among others) have been shown as means to induce the biosynthesis and accumulation of GABA in plant foods; and the main findings so far reported are presented in this review. Moreover, the most novel tools for the identification of metabolic response in plant materials based on GABA analysis will be also described.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
GABA, High-pressure processing, Metabolic response, Pulsed electric fields, Ultrasound
in
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026378853
DOI
10.1111/1541-4337.12285
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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2496fa14-a681-42ea-a226-f5906944489e
date added to LUP
2017-08-31 16:21:33
date last changed
2017-08-31 16:21:33
@article{2496fa14-a681-42ea-a226-f5906944489e,
  abstract     = {<p>Over the last several decades, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has attracted much attention due to its diverse physiological implications in plants, animals, and microorganisms. GABA naturally occurs in plant materials and its concentrations may vary considerably, from traces up to μmol/g (dry basis) depending on plant matrix, germination stage, and processing conditions, among other factors. However, due to its important biological activities, considerable interest has been shown by both food and pharmaceutical industries to improve its concentration in plants. Natural and conventional treatments such as mechanical and cold stimulation, anoxia, germination, enzyme treatment, adding exogenous glutamic acid (Glu) or gibberellins, and bacterial fermentation have been shown effective to increase the GABA concentration in several plant materials. However, some of these treatments can modify the nutritional, organoleptic, and/or functional properties of plants. Recent consumer demand for food products which are "healthy," safe and, having added benefits (nutraceuticals/functional components) has led to explore new ways to improve the content of bioactive compounds while maintaining desirable organoleptic and physicochemical properties. Along this line, nonthermal processing technologies (such as high-pressure processing, pulsed electric fields, and ultrasound, among others) have been shown as means to induce the biosynthesis and accumulation of GABA in plant foods; and the main findings so far reported are presented in this review. Moreover, the most novel tools for the identification of metabolic response in plant materials based on GABA analysis will be also described.</p>},
  author       = {Poojary, Mahesha M. and Dellarosa, Nicolò and Roohinejad, Shahin and Koubaa, Mohamed and Tylewicz, Urszula and Galindo, Federico Gómez and Saraiva, Jorge A. and Rosa, Marco Dalla and Barba, Francisco J.},
  keyword      = {GABA,High-pressure processing,Metabolic response,Pulsed electric fields,Ultrasound},
  language     = {eng},
  series       = {Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety},
  title        = {Influence of Innovative Processing on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Contents in Plant Food Materials},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1541-4337.12285},
  year         = {2017},
}