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Executive functions after orbital or lateral prefrontal lesions: Neuropsychological profiles and self-reported functions in everyday living

Løvstad, Marianne; Endestad, Tor; Funderud, Ingrid; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Meling, Torstein; Lindgren, Magnus LU ; Knight, Robert T and Solbakk, Anne-Kristin (2012) In Brain Injury 26(13-14). p.1586-1598
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Objective: This study examined the effects of chronic focal lesions to the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) on neuropsychological test performance and self-reported executive functioning in everyday living. Methods: Fourteen adults with OFC lesions were compared to 10 patients with LPFC injuries and 21 healthy controls. Neuropsychological tests with emphasis on measures of cognitive executive function were administered along with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions (BRIEF-A) and a psychiatric screening instrument. Results: The LPFC group differed from healthy controls on neuropsychological tests of sustained mental effort, response inhibition, working... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Objective: This study examined the effects of chronic focal lesions to the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) on neuropsychological test performance and self-reported executive functioning in everyday living. Methods: Fourteen adults with OFC lesions were compared to 10 patients with LPFC injuries and 21 healthy controls. Neuropsychological tests with emphasis on measures of cognitive executive function were administered along with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions (BRIEF-A) and a psychiatric screening instrument. Results: The LPFC group differed from healthy controls on neuropsychological tests of sustained mental effort, response inhibition, working memory and mental switching, while the BRIEF-A provided more clinically important information on deficits in everyday life in the OFC group compared to the LPFC group. Correlations between neuropsychological test results and BRIEF-A were weak, while the BRIEF-A correlated strongly with emotional distress. Conclusions: It was demonstrated that LPFC damage is particularly prone to cause cognitive executive deficit, while OFC injury is more strongly associated with self-reported dysexecutive symptoms in everyday living. The study illustrates the challenge of identifying executive deficit in individual patients and the lack of strong anatomical specificity of the currently employed methods. There is a need for an integrative methodological approach where standard testing batteries are supplemented with neuropsychiatric and frontal-specific rating scales. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cognition, frontal lobe, Executive functioning, neuropsychological, assessment
in
Brain Injury
volume
26
issue
13-14
pages
1586 - 1598
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000311419700005
  • scopus:84869404647
ISSN
1362-301X
DOI
10.3109/02699052.2012.698787
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
835cb3cb-bf16-4808-a8eb-afef5aaf61fe (old id 2594996)
date added to LUP
2012-05-30 13:26:28
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:01:13
@article{835cb3cb-bf16-4808-a8eb-afef5aaf61fe,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Objective: This study examined the effects of chronic focal lesions to the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) on neuropsychological test performance and self-reported executive functioning in everyday living. Methods: Fourteen adults with OFC lesions were compared to 10 patients with LPFC injuries and 21 healthy controls. Neuropsychological tests with emphasis on measures of cognitive executive function were administered along with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions (BRIEF-A) and a psychiatric screening instrument. Results: The LPFC group differed from healthy controls on neuropsychological tests of sustained mental effort, response inhibition, working memory and mental switching, while the BRIEF-A provided more clinically important information on deficits in everyday life in the OFC group compared to the LPFC group. Correlations between neuropsychological test results and BRIEF-A were weak, while the BRIEF-A correlated strongly with emotional distress. Conclusions: It was demonstrated that LPFC damage is particularly prone to cause cognitive executive deficit, while OFC injury is more strongly associated with self-reported dysexecutive symptoms in everyday living. The study illustrates the challenge of identifying executive deficit in individual patients and the lack of strong anatomical specificity of the currently employed methods. There is a need for an integrative methodological approach where standard testing batteries are supplemented with neuropsychiatric and frontal-specific rating scales.},
  author       = {Løvstad, Marianne and Endestad, Tor and Funderud, Ingrid and Due-Tønnessen, Paulina and Meling, Torstein and Lindgren, Magnus and Knight, Robert T and Solbakk, Anne-Kristin},
  issn         = {1362-301X},
  keyword      = {cognition,frontal lobe,Executive functioning,neuropsychological,assessment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13-14},
  pages        = {1586--1598},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Brain Injury},
  title        = {Executive functions after orbital or lateral prefrontal lesions: Neuropsychological profiles and self-reported functions in everyday living},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2012.698787},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}