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Survey of the management of acute pancreatitis in surgical departments in Sweden.

Andersson, Bodil LU ; Andrén-Sandberg, Ake; Nilsson, Johan and Andersson, Roland LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 47(8-9). p.1064-1070
Abstract
Objective:

Several international guidelines concerning the treatment of acute pancreatitis has been published during the last decades. However, Scandinavian guidelines are still lacking. The aim of the present study is to identify current treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis in Sweden and to evaluate if there is a need for improvement and the role of guidelines.



Material and methods:

A questionnaire was e-mailed to the surgical departments at all Swedish hospitals (n = 58) managing patients with acute pancreatitis. Comparisons were made both between university and non-university hospitals, and between hospitals with more versus less than 150,000 persons in the primary catchment population.... (More)
Objective:

Several international guidelines concerning the treatment of acute pancreatitis has been published during the last decades. However, Scandinavian guidelines are still lacking. The aim of the present study is to identify current treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis in Sweden and to evaluate if there is a need for improvement and the role of guidelines.



Material and methods:

A questionnaire was e-mailed to the surgical departments at all Swedish hospitals (n = 58) managing patients with acute pancreatitis. Comparisons were made both between university and non-university hospitals, and between hospitals with more versus less than 150,000 persons in the primary catchment population.



Results:

Fifty-one hospitals responded (88%). In median, 65 (12-200) patients with acute pancreatitis are treated yearly at each hospital. Of 51 hospitals, 18 perform a severity classification, with APACHE II being the most commonly used. A majority are of the opinion that a scoring system is not better than the judgment of a senior consultant. In severe acute pancreatitis, 29/48 routinely administer antibiotics, 29/48 use enteral nutrition, and 25/49 have a standardized follow-up plan. The majority considered administration of intravenous fluids as the most important treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. After mild gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis, the corresponding response was cholecystectomy, especially at larger hospitals (p = 0.002). Of 47, 42 are interested in developing a Scandinavian quality register.



Conclusions:

The results from this first Swedish national survey provide an insight into current traditions of treatment of acute pancreatitis and points, for example, at the lack of early severity stratification. A majority of hospitals are interested in developing a quality register in acute pancreatitis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
47
issue
8-9
pages
1064 - 1070
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000308213200025
  • PMID:22631566
  • Scopus:84865767988
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.3109/00365521.2012.685752
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75401206-bf1b-46a3-811f-a7679f310e28 (old id 2608458)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22631566?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-06-04 20:36:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:44:24
@article{75401206-bf1b-46a3-811f-a7679f310e28,
  abstract     = {Objective:<br/><br>
Several international guidelines concerning the treatment of acute pancreatitis has been published during the last decades. However, Scandinavian guidelines are still lacking. The aim of the present study is to identify current treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis in Sweden and to evaluate if there is a need for improvement and the role of guidelines. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Material and methods:<br/><br>
A questionnaire was e-mailed to the surgical departments at all Swedish hospitals (n = 58) managing patients with acute pancreatitis. Comparisons were made both between university and non-university hospitals, and between hospitals with more versus less than 150,000 persons in the primary catchment population. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results:<br/><br>
Fifty-one hospitals responded (88%). In median, 65 (12-200) patients with acute pancreatitis are treated yearly at each hospital. Of 51 hospitals, 18 perform a severity classification, with APACHE II being the most commonly used. A majority are of the opinion that a scoring system is not better than the judgment of a senior consultant. In severe acute pancreatitis, 29/48 routinely administer antibiotics, 29/48 use enteral nutrition, and 25/49 have a standardized follow-up plan. The majority considered administration of intravenous fluids as the most important treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. After mild gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis, the corresponding response was cholecystectomy, especially at larger hospitals (p = 0.002). Of 47, 42 are interested in developing a Scandinavian quality register. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions:<br/><br>
The results from this first Swedish national survey provide an insight into current traditions of treatment of acute pancreatitis and points, for example, at the lack of early severity stratification. A majority of hospitals are interested in developing a quality register in acute pancreatitis.},
  author       = {Andersson, Bodil and Andrén-Sandberg, Ake and Nilsson, Johan and Andersson, Roland},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8-9},
  pages        = {1064--1070},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Survey of the management of acute pancreatitis in surgical departments in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2012.685752},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2012},
}