Advanced

Malignant disease in the haemophilic population: moving towards a management consensus?

Astermark, Jan LU ; Makris, M; Mauser-Bunschoten, E; Nemes, L; D'oiron, R; Oldenburg, J and Ingerslev, J (2012) In Haemophilia 18(5). p.664-671
Abstract
The Malignancy in Haemophilia Workshop Group convened a consensus working group of haematologists and oncologists to review topics related to malignancy in haemophilia. The treatment of malignant disease in this population is increasingly relevant as both outcome and lifespan continue to improve. Although adequate guidance exists for control of spontaneous bleeding episodes and of haemostasis in general surgery, information for management of haemostasis in patients with various malignancies is sparse. To date, no clinical guidelines exist for management of complex bleeding problems, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of malignancies in haemophilia. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether or not morbidity and mortality outcomes associated... (More)
The Malignancy in Haemophilia Workshop Group convened a consensus working group of haematologists and oncologists to review topics related to malignancy in haemophilia. The treatment of malignant disease in this population is increasingly relevant as both outcome and lifespan continue to improve. Although adequate guidance exists for control of spontaneous bleeding episodes and of haemostasis in general surgery, information for management of haemostasis in patients with various malignancies is sparse. To date, no clinical guidelines exist for management of complex bleeding problems, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of malignancies in haemophilia. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether or not morbidity and mortality outcomes associated with malignancies are affected by haemophilia or by its treatment. Through presentation of five malignancies - prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, acute leukaemia, bladder cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma - important issues are highlighted, such as risk from bleeding as a symptom of malignancy; risks from invasive screenings and how these should be handled in haemophilic individuals; the implications of chemotherapy and treatment schedules, bone marrow suppression, radiotherapy, or surgery; and the likelihood of an interaction between treatment for haemophilia and malignancy outcomes. Ultimately, the aim is to establish consensus guidelines to direct and harmonize future treatment policy for malignant disease in the haemophilic population. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Haemophilia
volume
18
issue
5
pages
664 - 671
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000307900700020
  • pmid:22630161
  • scopus:84865553452
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2516.2012.02846.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
32057fb7-6321-424c-a6ba-9d92b2b7a146 (old id 2608470)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22630161?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-06-04 20:41:35
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:42:27
@article{32057fb7-6321-424c-a6ba-9d92b2b7a146,
  abstract     = {The Malignancy in Haemophilia Workshop Group convened a consensus working group of haematologists and oncologists to review topics related to malignancy in haemophilia. The treatment of malignant disease in this population is increasingly relevant as both outcome and lifespan continue to improve. Although adequate guidance exists for control of spontaneous bleeding episodes and of haemostasis in general surgery, information for management of haemostasis in patients with various malignancies is sparse. To date, no clinical guidelines exist for management of complex bleeding problems, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of malignancies in haemophilia. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether or not morbidity and mortality outcomes associated with malignancies are affected by haemophilia or by its treatment. Through presentation of five malignancies - prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, acute leukaemia, bladder cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma - important issues are highlighted, such as risk from bleeding as a symptom of malignancy; risks from invasive screenings and how these should be handled in haemophilic individuals; the implications of chemotherapy and treatment schedules, bone marrow suppression, radiotherapy, or surgery; and the likelihood of an interaction between treatment for haemophilia and malignancy outcomes. Ultimately, the aim is to establish consensus guidelines to direct and harmonize future treatment policy for malignant disease in the haemophilic population.},
  author       = {Astermark, Jan and Makris, M and Mauser-Bunschoten, E and Nemes, L and D'oiron, R and Oldenburg, J and Ingerslev, J},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {664--671},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {Malignant disease in the haemophilic population: moving towards a management consensus?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2012.02846.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2012},
}