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Electrospun nerve guide conduits have the potential to bridge peripheral nerve injuries in vivo.

Frost, Hanna LU ; Andersson, Tomas; Johansson, Sebastian; Englund Johansson, Ulrica LU ; Ekström, Per LU ; Dahlin, Lars LU and Johansson, Fredrik LU (2018) In Scientific Reports 8(Article number: 16716).
Abstract (Swedish)
Electrospinning can be used to mimic the architecture of an acellular nerve graft, combining microfibers for guidance, and pores for cellular infiltration. We made electrospun nerve guides, from polycaprolactone (PCL) or poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), with aligned fibers along the insides of the channels and random fibers around them. We bridged a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect with the guides, and, in selected groups, added a cell transplant derived from autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For control, we compared to hollow silicone tubes; or autologous nerve grafts. PCL nerve guides had a high degree of autotomy (8/43 rats), a negative indicator with respect to future usefulness, while PLLA supported axonal regeneration, but did not... (More)
Electrospinning can be used to mimic the architecture of an acellular nerve graft, combining microfibers for guidance, and pores for cellular infiltration. We made electrospun nerve guides, from polycaprolactone (PCL) or poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), with aligned fibers along the insides of the channels and random fibers around them. We bridged a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect with the guides, and, in selected groups, added a cell transplant derived from autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For control, we compared to hollow silicone tubes; or autologous nerve grafts. PCL nerve guides had a high degree of autotomy (8/43 rats), a negative indicator with respect to future usefulness, while PLLA supported axonal regeneration, but did not outperform autologous nerve grafts. Transplanted cells survived in the PLLA nerve guides, but axonal regeneration was not enhanced as compared to nerve guides alone. The inflammatory response was partially enhanced by the transplanted cells in PLLA nerve grafts; Schwann cells were poorly distributed compared to nerve guide without cells. Tailor-made electrospun nerve guides support axonal regeneration in vivo, and can act as vehicles for co-transplanted cells. Our results motivate further studies exploring novel nerve guides and the effect of stromal cell-derived factors on nerve generation. (Less)
Abstract
Electrospinning can be used to mimic the architecture of an acellular nerve graft, combining microfibers for guidance, and pores for cellular infiltration. We made electrospun nerve guides, from polycaprolactone (PCL) or poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), with aligned fibers along the insides of the channels and random fibers around them. We bridged a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect with the guides, and, in selected groups, added a cell transplant derived from autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For control, we compared to hollow silicone tubes; or autologous nerve grafts. PCL nerve guides had a high degree of autotomy (8/43 rats), a negative indicator with respect to future usefulness, while PLLA supported axonal regeneration, but did not... (More)
Electrospinning can be used to mimic the architecture of an acellular nerve graft, combining microfibers for guidance, and pores for cellular infiltration. We made electrospun nerve guides, from polycaprolactone (PCL) or poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), with aligned fibers along the insides of the channels and random fibers around them. We bridged a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect with the guides, and, in selected groups, added a cell transplant derived from autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For control, we compared to hollow silicone tubes; or autologous nerve grafts. PCL nerve guides had a high degree of autotomy (8/43 rats), a negative indicator with respect to future usefulness, while PLLA supported axonal regeneration, but did not outperform autologous nerve grafts. Transplanted cells survived in the PLLA nerve guides, but axonal regeneration was not enhanced as compared to nerve guides alone. The inflammatory response was partially enhanced by the transplanted cells in PLLA nerve grafts; Schwann cells were poorly distributed compared to nerve guide without cells. Tailor-made electrospun nerve guides support axonal regeneration in vivo, and can act as vehicles for co-transplanted cells. Our results motivate further studies exploring novel nerve guides and the effect of stromal cell-derived factors on nerve generation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
peripheral nerve injury, nerve repair, electrospinning, nanofibers, cell therapy, autologous transplantation
in
Scientific Reports
volume
8
issue
Article number: 16716
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056484486
ISSN
2045-2322
DOI
10.1038/s41598-018-34699-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2621120a-00b7-428e-b844-139741c2a97b
date added to LUP
2018-11-15 11:32:25
date last changed
2019-07-16 04:00:20
@article{2621120a-00b7-428e-b844-139741c2a97b,
  abstract     = {Electrospinning can be used to mimic the architecture of an acellular nerve graft, combining microfibers for guidance, and pores for cellular infiltration. We made electrospun nerve guides, from polycaprolactone (PCL) or poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), with aligned fibers along the insides of the channels and random fibers around them. We bridged a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect with the guides, and, in selected groups, added a cell transplant derived from autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For control, we compared to hollow silicone tubes; or autologous nerve grafts. PCL nerve guides had a high degree of autotomy (8/43 rats), a negative indicator with respect to future usefulness, while PLLA supported axonal regeneration, but did not outperform autologous nerve grafts. Transplanted cells survived in the PLLA nerve guides, but axonal regeneration was not enhanced as compared to nerve guides alone. The inflammatory response was partially enhanced by the transplanted cells in PLLA nerve grafts; Schwann cells were poorly distributed compared to nerve guide without cells. Tailor-made electrospun nerve guides support axonal regeneration in vivo, and can act as vehicles for co-transplanted cells. Our results motivate further studies exploring novel nerve guides and the effect of stromal cell-derived factors on nerve generation.},
  articleno    = {16716},
  author       = {Frost, Hanna and Andersson, Tomas and Johansson, Sebastian and Englund Johansson, Ulrica and Ekström, Per and Dahlin, Lars and Johansson, Fredrik},
  issn         = {2045-2322},
  keyword      = {peripheral nerve injury,nerve repair,electrospinning,nanofibers,cell therapy,autologous transplantation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {Article number: 16716},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Scientific Reports},
  title        = {Electrospun nerve guide conduits have the potential to bridge peripheral nerve injuries in vivo.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-34699-8},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2018},
}