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Memory aging and brain maintenance

Nyberg, Lars; Lövdén, Martin LU ; Riklund, Katrine; Lindenberger, Ulman and Backman, Lars (2012) In Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16(5). p.292-305
Abstract
Episodic memory and working memory decline with advancing age. Nevertheless, large-scale population-based studies document well-preserved memory functioning in some older individuals. The influential 'reserve' notion holds that individual differences in brain characteristics or in the manner people process tasks allow some individuals to cope better than others with brain pathology and hence show preserved memory performance. Here, we discuss a complementary concept, that of brain maintenance (or relative lack of brain pathology), and argue that it constitutes the primary determinant of successful memory aging. We discuss evidence for brain maintenance at different levels: cellular, neurochemical, gray- and white-matter integrity, and... (More)
Episodic memory and working memory decline with advancing age. Nevertheless, large-scale population-based studies document well-preserved memory functioning in some older individuals. The influential 'reserve' notion holds that individual differences in brain characteristics or in the manner people process tasks allow some individuals to cope better than others with brain pathology and hence show preserved memory performance. Here, we discuss a complementary concept, that of brain maintenance (or relative lack of brain pathology), and argue that it constitutes the primary determinant of successful memory aging. We discuss evidence for brain maintenance at different levels: cellular, neurochemical, gray- and white-matter integrity, and systems-level activation patterns. Various genetic and lifestyle factors support brain maintenance in aging and interventions may be designed to promote maintenance of brain structure and function in late life. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Cognitive Sciences
volume
16
issue
5
pages
292 - 305
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000304026200010
  • scopus:84860379706
ISSN
1364-6613
DOI
10.1016/j.tics.2012.04.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fd4c93d3-d9c5-4a10-a2b6-01de00ac4c37 (old id 2826798)
date added to LUP
2012-06-20 13:36:30
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:04:59
@article{fd4c93d3-d9c5-4a10-a2b6-01de00ac4c37,
  abstract     = {Episodic memory and working memory decline with advancing age. Nevertheless, large-scale population-based studies document well-preserved memory functioning in some older individuals. The influential 'reserve' notion holds that individual differences in brain characteristics or in the manner people process tasks allow some individuals to cope better than others with brain pathology and hence show preserved memory performance. Here, we discuss a complementary concept, that of brain maintenance (or relative lack of brain pathology), and argue that it constitutes the primary determinant of successful memory aging. We discuss evidence for brain maintenance at different levels: cellular, neurochemical, gray- and white-matter integrity, and systems-level activation patterns. Various genetic and lifestyle factors support brain maintenance in aging and interventions may be designed to promote maintenance of brain structure and function in late life.},
  author       = {Nyberg, Lars and Lövdén, Martin and Riklund, Katrine and Lindenberger, Ulman and Backman, Lars},
  issn         = {1364-6613},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {292--305},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  title        = {Memory aging and brain maintenance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2012.04.005},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2012},
}