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Acculturation and celiac disease risk in second-generation immigrants: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.

Wingren, Carl Johan LU ; Agardh, Daniel LU and Merlo, Juan LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 47(10). p.1174-1180
Abstract
Objectives:

The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery.



Material and methods:

Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as... (More)
Objectives:

The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery.



Material and methods:

Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as a function of the mother's geographical region of birth and length of stay in Sweden before delivery using Cox regression models.



Results:

In children whose mothers immigrated to Sweden from a country outside of Europe, a maternal length of stay in Sweden of more than 5 years increased the hazard ratio (HR) of CD (1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.81). The authors observed a similar result among children born to mothers from a Nordic country outside of Sweden (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.89-2.75), but a non-conclusive protective effect was observed in second-generation immigrant children from a non-Nordic European country (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.39-1.09).



Conclusions:

The risk of CD among second-generation immigrants seems to be conditioned by maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery, suggesting that environmental factors contribute to the variation in CD risk observed across populations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
47
issue
10
pages
1174 - 1180
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000308948400006
  • PMID:22827636
  • Scopus:84866604567
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.3109/00365521.2012.703238
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c3af92a3-18b2-4488-a996-c7c8be34396d (old id 2966699)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22827636?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-08-10 08:29:22
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:49:07
@article{c3af92a3-18b2-4488-a996-c7c8be34396d,
  abstract     = {Objectives:<br/><br>
The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Material and methods:<br/><br>
Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as a function of the mother's geographical region of birth and length of stay in Sweden before delivery using Cox regression models. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: <br/><br>
In children whose mothers immigrated to Sweden from a country outside of Europe, a maternal length of stay in Sweden of more than 5 years increased the hazard ratio (HR) of CD (1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.81). The authors observed a similar result among children born to mothers from a Nordic country outside of Sweden (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.89-2.75), but a non-conclusive protective effect was observed in second-generation immigrant children from a non-Nordic European country (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.39-1.09). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions:<br/><br>
The risk of CD among second-generation immigrants seems to be conditioned by maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery, suggesting that environmental factors contribute to the variation in CD risk observed across populations.},
  author       = {Wingren, Carl Johan and Agardh, Daniel and Merlo, Juan},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1174--1180},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Acculturation and celiac disease risk in second-generation immigrants: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2012.703238},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2012},
}