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Neighborhood deprivation and risk of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality: A multilevel analysis from Sweden.

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Calling, Susanna LU ; Zöller, Bengt LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In Gynecologic Oncology 127(2). p.283-289
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

To analyze whether there is an association between neighborhood deprivation and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, beyond individual level characteristics.



DESIGN:

The entire Swedish population aged 25 to 74, a total of 1.9million women, were followed from January 1, 1990, until hospital admission due to cervical cancer during the study period, or the end of the study on December 31, 2008. Multilevel logistic regression was used in the analysis with individual level characteristics (age, marital status, family income, education, immigration status, urban/rural status, mobility, comorbidities, parities, and number of partners) at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation... (More)
OBJECTIVES:

To analyze whether there is an association between neighborhood deprivation and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, beyond individual level characteristics.



DESIGN:

The entire Swedish population aged 25 to 74, a total of 1.9million women, were followed from January 1, 1990, until hospital admission due to cervical cancer during the study period, or the end of the study on December 31, 2008. Multilevel logistic regression was used in the analysis with individual level characteristics (age, marital status, family income, education, immigration status, urban/rural status, mobility, comorbidities, parities, and number of partners) at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation at the second level. Neighborhood deprivation was measured at small area market statistics level by the use of an index.



RESULTS:

There was a strong association between level of neighborhood deprivation and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. In the full model, which took account of the individual level characteristics, the risks of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality were 1.25 and 1.36, respectively, in the most deprived neighborhoods. The between neighborhood variance was over twice the standard error, indicating significant differences in cervical cancer morbidity and mortality between neighborhoods.



CONCLUSIONS:

This study is the largest to date of the influences of neighborhood deprivation on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. The results suggest that neighborhood characteristics affect cervical cancer morbidity and mortality independently of individual level sociodemographic characteristics. Both individual and neighborhood level approaches are important in health care policies. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Gynecologic Oncology
volume
127
issue
2
pages
283 - 289
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000310097800005
  • pmid:22819937
  • scopus:84867395793
ISSN
1095-6859
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.07.103
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
353c8012-294d-4621-bbe9-aee55d61175a (old id 2966810)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22819937?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-08-10 08:01:20
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:17:25
@article{353c8012-294d-4621-bbe9-aee55d61175a,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: <br/><br>
To analyze whether there is an association between neighborhood deprivation and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, beyond individual level characteristics. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN: <br/><br>
The entire Swedish population aged 25 to 74, a total of 1.9million women, were followed from January 1, 1990, until hospital admission due to cervical cancer during the study period, or the end of the study on December 31, 2008. Multilevel logistic regression was used in the analysis with individual level characteristics (age, marital status, family income, education, immigration status, urban/rural status, mobility, comorbidities, parities, and number of partners) at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation at the second level. Neighborhood deprivation was measured at small area market statistics level by the use of an index. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
There was a strong association between level of neighborhood deprivation and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. In the full model, which took account of the individual level characteristics, the risks of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality were 1.25 and 1.36, respectively, in the most deprived neighborhoods. The between neighborhood variance was over twice the standard error, indicating significant differences in cervical cancer morbidity and mortality between neighborhoods. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
This study is the largest to date of the influences of neighborhood deprivation on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. The results suggest that neighborhood characteristics affect cervical cancer morbidity and mortality independently of individual level sociodemographic characteristics. Both individual and neighborhood level approaches are important in health care policies.},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Calling, Susanna and Zöller, Bengt and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1095-6859},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {283--289},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Gynecologic Oncology},
  title        = {Neighborhood deprivation and risk of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality: A multilevel analysis from Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.07.103},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2012},
}