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The anti-staling effect of pre-gelatinized flour and emulsifier in gluten-free bread

Purhagen, Jeanette LU ; Sjöö, Malin LU and Eliasson, Ann-Charlotte LU (2012) In European Food Research and Technology 235(2). p.265-276
Abstract
The use of gluten-free products is increasing since an increasing number of people (1-2 %) are suffering from Celiac disease and thereby need a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free bread tends to have shorter shelf life and quality compared with white wheat bread. In this study, 3 % (flour basis) of pre-gelatinized oat and barley flour as well as an emulsifier were added to a gluten-free mix to increase the water content by 1.5-2 %, affect the starch retrogradation and the formation of amylose lipid complex. The staling was followed measuring the firmness (texture analyzer), water content and distribution (nuclear magnetic resonance), amylopectin retrogradation and the formation of amylose-lipid complex (differential scanning calorimetry) in... (More)
The use of gluten-free products is increasing since an increasing number of people (1-2 %) are suffering from Celiac disease and thereby need a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free bread tends to have shorter shelf life and quality compared with white wheat bread. In this study, 3 % (flour basis) of pre-gelatinized oat and barley flour as well as an emulsifier were added to a gluten-free mix to increase the water content by 1.5-2 %, affect the starch retrogradation and the formation of amylose lipid complex. The staling was followed measuring the firmness (texture analyzer), water content and distribution (nuclear magnetic resonance), amylopectin retrogradation and the formation of amylose-lipid complex (differential scanning calorimetry) in order to see the impact of both macroscopic and molecular changes on firmness. Both gluten-free bread and a white wheat bread were used as control loaves. Largest specific volume was found in the gluten-free control. The firmness varied with both the specific volume and the point of measurement. The amount of retrograded amylopectin increased the firmness, although this effect was dependent on the type of bread, in terms of distribution and availability of the water within the system. The proton relaxation time, which was representing movable water, decreased during storage and revealed that both the amylopectin retrogradation and the lipid complex formation were affecting the rigidity of the amorphous domain and not only the crystalline regions. In contrast to the other recipes, the use of emulsifier caused limited retrogradation and a low correlation between the texture properties and time-dependent events. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Staling, Gluten-free bread, Starch retrogradation, Firmness, Proton, relaxation
in
European Food Research and Technology
volume
235
issue
2
pages
265 - 276
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000306439800008
  • scopus:84864357910
ISSN
1438-2377
DOI
10.1007/s00217-012-1753-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1899f581-b514-445d-8b55-f9a004432edf (old id 2973163)
date added to LUP
2012-08-23 10:41:22
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:17:00
@article{1899f581-b514-445d-8b55-f9a004432edf,
  abstract     = {The use of gluten-free products is increasing since an increasing number of people (1-2 %) are suffering from Celiac disease and thereby need a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free bread tends to have shorter shelf life and quality compared with white wheat bread. In this study, 3 % (flour basis) of pre-gelatinized oat and barley flour as well as an emulsifier were added to a gluten-free mix to increase the water content by 1.5-2 %, affect the starch retrogradation and the formation of amylose lipid complex. The staling was followed measuring the firmness (texture analyzer), water content and distribution (nuclear magnetic resonance), amylopectin retrogradation and the formation of amylose-lipid complex (differential scanning calorimetry) in order to see the impact of both macroscopic and molecular changes on firmness. Both gluten-free bread and a white wheat bread were used as control loaves. Largest specific volume was found in the gluten-free control. The firmness varied with both the specific volume and the point of measurement. The amount of retrograded amylopectin increased the firmness, although this effect was dependent on the type of bread, in terms of distribution and availability of the water within the system. The proton relaxation time, which was representing movable water, decreased during storage and revealed that both the amylopectin retrogradation and the lipid complex formation were affecting the rigidity of the amorphous domain and not only the crystalline regions. In contrast to the other recipes, the use of emulsifier caused limited retrogradation and a low correlation between the texture properties and time-dependent events.},
  author       = {Purhagen, Jeanette and Sjöö, Malin and Eliasson, Ann-Charlotte},
  issn         = {1438-2377},
  keyword      = {Staling,Gluten-free bread,Starch retrogradation,Firmness,Proton,relaxation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {265--276},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Food Research and Technology},
  title        = {The anti-staling effect of pre-gelatinized flour and emulsifier in gluten-free bread},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00217-012-1753-4},
  volume       = {235},
  year         = {2012},
}