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Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning

Rasmussen, Anders LU ; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders LU ; Wetmore, Daniel LU and Hesslow, Germund LU (2014) In Frontiers in Neural Circuits 8(90). p.13-90
Abstract
The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or "Purkinje cell CRs" to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned... (More)
The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or "Purkinje cell CRs" to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI), which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Frontiers in Neural Circuits
volume
8
issue
90
pages
13 - 90
publisher
Frontiers
external identifiers
  • pmid:25140129
  • wos:000340084100001
  • scopus:84905594072
ISSN
1662-5110
DOI
10.3389/fncir.2014.00090
project
Cognition, Communication and Learning
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ce7e2e1-a6fb-4821-957a-c315ada0cc09 (old id 4614245)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25140129?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-09-08 20:49:19
date last changed
2017-12-17 03:42:57
@article{2ce7e2e1-a6fb-4821-957a-c315ada0cc09,
  abstract     = {The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or "Purkinje cell CRs" to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI), which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive.},
  author       = {Rasmussen, Anders and Jirenhed, Dan-Anders and Wetmore, Daniel and Hesslow, Germund},
  issn         = {1662-5110},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {90},
  pages        = {13--90},
  publisher    = {Frontiers},
  series       = {Frontiers in Neural Circuits},
  title        = {Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncir.2014.00090},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2014},
}