Advanced

General Principles of Nanoemulsion Formation by High-Energy Mechanical Methods

Håkansson, Andreas LU and Rayner, Marilyn LU (2018) p.103-139
Abstract

Emulsion formation is a challenging task. Breaking a large drop into smaller fragments gives rise to an increase in the total interfacial area and, consequently, in the interfacial energy. External energy must, therefore, be supplied to form an emulsion. Nanoemulsion formation is even more challenging since small drops require even higher interfacial energy.The high-energy methods are designed to supply the energy required for emulsification by subjecting it to a disruptive hydrodynamic stress, that is, laminar or turbulent shear or cavitation. This chapter provides an overview of the current understanding of the mechanical principles of the high-energy methods. It discusses how they give rise to emulsification, both in terms of the... (More)

Emulsion formation is a challenging task. Breaking a large drop into smaller fragments gives rise to an increase in the total interfacial area and, consequently, in the interfacial energy. External energy must, therefore, be supplied to form an emulsion. Nanoemulsion formation is even more challenging since small drops require even higher interfacial energy.The high-energy methods are designed to supply the energy required for emulsification by subjecting it to a disruptive hydrodynamic stress, that is, laminar or turbulent shear or cavitation. This chapter provides an overview of the current understanding of the mechanical principles of the high-energy methods. It discusses how they give rise to emulsification, both in terms of the traditional stress-balance description and of dynamic theories of emulsification. Special emphasis is placed on the difference between forming micrometer range emulsions and nanoemulsions.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cavitation, Coalescence, Drop breakup, Emulsification, Fragmentation, Laminar shear, Turbulent stress
host publication
Nanoemulsions : Formulation, Applications, and Characterization - Formulation, Applications, and Characterization
pages
37 pages
publisher
Elsevier Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056103676
ISBN
9780128118399
9780128118382
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-811838-2.00005-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2d7c4421-0760-4204-867a-ffbf7d2fe7d6
date added to LUP
2019-03-11 13:02:22
date last changed
2020-09-16 04:11:44
@inbook{2d7c4421-0760-4204-867a-ffbf7d2fe7d6,
  abstract     = {<p>Emulsion formation is a challenging task. Breaking a large drop into smaller fragments gives rise to an increase in the total interfacial area and, consequently, in the interfacial energy. External energy must, therefore, be supplied to form an emulsion. Nanoemulsion formation is even more challenging since small drops require even higher interfacial energy.The high-energy methods are designed to supply the energy required for emulsification by subjecting it to a disruptive hydrodynamic stress, that is, laminar or turbulent shear or cavitation. This chapter provides an overview of the current understanding of the mechanical principles of the high-energy methods. It discusses how they give rise to emulsification, both in terms of the traditional stress-balance description and of dynamic theories of emulsification. Special emphasis is placed on the difference between forming micrometer range emulsions and nanoemulsions.</p>},
  author       = {Håkansson, Andreas and Rayner, Marilyn},
  booktitle    = {Nanoemulsions : Formulation, Applications, and Characterization},
  isbn         = {9780128118399},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {103--139},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Inc.},
  title        = {General Principles of Nanoemulsion Formation by High-Energy Mechanical Methods},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-811838-2.00005-9},
  doi          = {10.1016/B978-0-12-811838-2.00005-9},
  year         = {2018},
}