Advanced

Risk of hospitalization for type 2 diabetes in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden: a nationwide follow-up study.

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Zöller, Bengt LU ; Bennet, Louise LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

This is the first nationwide study with the aim to analyze whether there is an association between country of birth in first-generation immigrants and hospitalization for type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to study whether any such association remains in second-generation immigrants.



DESIGN:

In this follow-up study, the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register was used to identify all hospital diagnoses of T2D in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden between January 1, 1964 and December 31, 2007. Hospitalization rate ratios standardized with regard to gender, age, geographical region, socioeconomic status, obesity, and family history of hospitalization for T2D were estimated in first- and... (More)
OBJECTIVES:

This is the first nationwide study with the aim to analyze whether there is an association between country of birth in first-generation immigrants and hospitalization for type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to study whether any such association remains in second-generation immigrants.



DESIGN:

In this follow-up study, the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register was used to identify all hospital diagnoses of T2D in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden between January 1, 1964 and December 31, 2007. Hospitalization rate ratios standardized with regard to gender, age, geographical region, socioeconomic status, obesity, and family history of hospitalization for T2D were estimated in first- and second-generation immigrants.



RESULTS:

Both increased and decreased risks of hospitalization for T2D were shown for several first-generation immigrant groups. However, only second-generation immigrants with Finnish or former Yugoslavian parents had higher rates of hospitalization for T2D than the reference group. No other differences remained in the second-generation immigrants.



CONCLUSIONS:

The present study suggests that ethnic environmental factors may be more important than ethnic genetic factors in explaining the observed variation in hospitalization for T2D among first-generation immigrants. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000314329100012
  • pmid:22858169
  • scopus:84872492452
ISSN
1873-460X
DOI
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.06.015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
48fedd9b-52ec-45a4-992f-fc7a87da9c38 (old id 3047786)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22858169?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-04 20:59:07
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:55:15
@article{48fedd9b-52ec-45a4-992f-fc7a87da9c38,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: <br/><br>
This is the first nationwide study with the aim to analyze whether there is an association between country of birth in first-generation immigrants and hospitalization for type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to study whether any such association remains in second-generation immigrants. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN: <br/><br>
In this follow-up study, the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register was used to identify all hospital diagnoses of T2D in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden between January 1, 1964 and December 31, 2007. Hospitalization rate ratios standardized with regard to gender, age, geographical region, socioeconomic status, obesity, and family history of hospitalization for T2D were estimated in first- and second-generation immigrants. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
Both increased and decreased risks of hospitalization for T2D were shown for several first-generation immigrant groups. However, only second-generation immigrants with Finnish or former Yugoslavian parents had higher rates of hospitalization for T2D than the reference group. No other differences remained in the second-generation immigrants. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
The present study suggests that ethnic environmental factors may be more important than ethnic genetic factors in explaining the observed variation in hospitalization for T2D among first-generation immigrants.},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Zöller, Bengt and Bennet, Louise and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1873-460X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Diabetes and its Complications},
  title        = {Risk of hospitalization for type 2 diabetes in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden: a nationwide follow-up study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.06.015},
  year         = {2012},
}