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Interactions of the complement system with molecules of extracellular matrix: Relevance for joint diseases.

Happonen, Kaisa LU ; Heinegård, Dick LU ; Saxne, Tore LU and Blom, Anna LU (2012) In Immunobiology 217(11). p.1088-1096
Abstract
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease affecting all structures of the joint. Understanding the pathology behind the development of RA is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies as well as for developing novel markers to predict disease onset. Several molecules normally hidden within the cartilage tissue are exposed to complement components in the synovial fluid upon cartilage breakdown. Some of these have been shown to activate complement and toll-like receptors, which may enhance an already existing inflammatory response, thereby worsening the course of disease. Other cartilage-resident molecules have in contrast shown to possess complement-inhibitory properties. Knowledge about mechanisms behind... (More)
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease affecting all structures of the joint. Understanding the pathology behind the development of RA is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies as well as for developing novel markers to predict disease onset. Several molecules normally hidden within the cartilage tissue are exposed to complement components in the synovial fluid upon cartilage breakdown. Some of these have been shown to activate complement and toll-like receptors, which may enhance an already existing inflammatory response, thereby worsening the course of disease. Other cartilage-resident molecules have in contrast shown to possess complement-inhibitory properties. Knowledge about mechanisms behind pathological complement activation in the joints will hopefully lead to methods which allow us to distinguish patients with pathological complement activation from those where other inflammatory pathways are predominant. This will help to elucidate which patients will benefit from complement inhibitory therapies, which are thought to aid a specific subset of patients or patients at a certain stage of disease. Future challenges are to target the complement inhibition specifically to the joints to minimize systemic complement blockade. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Immunobiology
volume
217
issue
11
pages
1088 - 1096
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000311187800008
  • pmid:22964234
  • scopus:84866033089
ISSN
1878-3279
DOI
10.1016/j.imbio.2012.07.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
066df9b3-081b-4897-aa07-6764a3fb6f5a (old id 3124080)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22964234?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-10-04 17:22:49
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:58:46
@article{066df9b3-081b-4897-aa07-6764a3fb6f5a,
  abstract     = {Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease affecting all structures of the joint. Understanding the pathology behind the development of RA is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies as well as for developing novel markers to predict disease onset. Several molecules normally hidden within the cartilage tissue are exposed to complement components in the synovial fluid upon cartilage breakdown. Some of these have been shown to activate complement and toll-like receptors, which may enhance an already existing inflammatory response, thereby worsening the course of disease. Other cartilage-resident molecules have in contrast shown to possess complement-inhibitory properties. Knowledge about mechanisms behind pathological complement activation in the joints will hopefully lead to methods which allow us to distinguish patients with pathological complement activation from those where other inflammatory pathways are predominant. This will help to elucidate which patients will benefit from complement inhibitory therapies, which are thought to aid a specific subset of patients or patients at a certain stage of disease. Future challenges are to target the complement inhibition specifically to the joints to minimize systemic complement blockade.},
  author       = {Happonen, Kaisa and Heinegård, Dick and Saxne, Tore and Blom, Anna},
  issn         = {1878-3279},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1088--1096},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Immunobiology},
  title        = {Interactions of the complement system with molecules of extracellular matrix: Relevance for joint diseases.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imbio.2012.07.013},
  volume       = {217},
  year         = {2012},
}