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Hemoglobin adducts as a measure of variations in exposure to acrylamide in food and comparison to questionnaire data

Vikstrom, Anna C.; Warholm, Margareta; Paulsson, Birgit; Axmon, Anna LU ; Wirfält, Elisabet LU and Tornqvist, Margareta (2012) In Food and Chemical Toxicology 50(7). p.2531-2539
Abstract
Measurement of haemoglobin (Hb) adducts from acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite glycidamide (GA) is a possibility to improve the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies of AA intake from food. This study aims to clarify the reliability of Hb-adduct measurement from individual single samples for exposure assessment of dietary AA intake. The intra-individual variations of AA- and GA-adduct levels measured in blood samples collected over 20 months from 13 non-smokers were up to 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively. The corresponding interindividual variations observed between 68 non-smokers, with large differences in AA intake, were 6-fold and 8-fold, respectively. The intra-individual variation of the GA-to-AA-adduct level ratio was up to... (More)
Measurement of haemoglobin (Hb) adducts from acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite glycidamide (GA) is a possibility to improve the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies of AA intake from food. This study aims to clarify the reliability of Hb-adduct measurement from individual single samples for exposure assessment of dietary AA intake. The intra-individual variations of AA- and GA-adduct levels measured in blood samples collected over 20 months from 13 non-smokers were up to 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively. The corresponding interindividual variations observed between 68 non-smokers, with large differences in AA intake, were 6-fold and 8-fold, respectively. The intra-individual variation of the GA-to-AA-adduct level ratio was up to 3-fold, compared to 11-fold between individuals (n = 68). From AA-adduct levels the average AA daily intake (n = 68) was calculated and compared to that estimated from dietary history methodology: 0.52 and 0.67 mu g/kg body weight and day, respectively. At an individual level the measures showed low association (Rs = 0.39). Conclusions: Dietary AA is the dominating source to measured AA-adduct levels and corresponding inter- and intra-individual variations in non-smokers. Measurements from single individual samples are useful for calculation of average M intake and its variation in a cohort, and for identification of individuals only from extreme intake groups. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Acrylamide, Dietary intake, Glycidamide, Dietary history methodology, Individual variation, Food frequency questionnaire
in
Food and Chemical Toxicology
volume
50
issue
7
pages
2531 - 2539
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000307320200038
  • scopus:84861440559
ISSN
0278-6915
DOI
10.1016/j.fct.2012.04.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c8ff0d32-dae0-44f8-a9fe-d07ac8b36631 (old id 3191558)
date added to LUP
2012-12-03 07:13:01
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:10:29
@article{c8ff0d32-dae0-44f8-a9fe-d07ac8b36631,
  abstract     = {Measurement of haemoglobin (Hb) adducts from acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite glycidamide (GA) is a possibility to improve the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies of AA intake from food. This study aims to clarify the reliability of Hb-adduct measurement from individual single samples for exposure assessment of dietary AA intake. The intra-individual variations of AA- and GA-adduct levels measured in blood samples collected over 20 months from 13 non-smokers were up to 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively. The corresponding interindividual variations observed between 68 non-smokers, with large differences in AA intake, were 6-fold and 8-fold, respectively. The intra-individual variation of the GA-to-AA-adduct level ratio was up to 3-fold, compared to 11-fold between individuals (n = 68). From AA-adduct levels the average AA daily intake (n = 68) was calculated and compared to that estimated from dietary history methodology: 0.52 and 0.67 mu g/kg body weight and day, respectively. At an individual level the measures showed low association (Rs = 0.39). Conclusions: Dietary AA is the dominating source to measured AA-adduct levels and corresponding inter- and intra-individual variations in non-smokers. Measurements from single individual samples are useful for calculation of average M intake and its variation in a cohort, and for identification of individuals only from extreme intake groups. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Vikstrom, Anna C. and Warholm, Margareta and Paulsson, Birgit and Axmon, Anna and Wirfält, Elisabet and Tornqvist, Margareta},
  issn         = {0278-6915},
  keyword      = {Acrylamide,Dietary intake,Glycidamide,Dietary history methodology,Individual variation,Food frequency questionnaire},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2531--2539},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Food and Chemical Toxicology},
  title        = {Hemoglobin adducts as a measure of variations in exposure to acrylamide in food and comparison to questionnaire data},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2012.04.004},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2012},
}