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The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register – contents, completeness and validity

, ; Norman, Mikael; Källén, Karin LU ; Wahlström, Erik and Håkansson, Stellan (2019) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Abstract

Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers. Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers’ agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years. Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24–34, completeness of SNQ was 98–99%. Below and above... (More)

Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers. Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers’ agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years. Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24–34, completeness of SNQ was 98–99%. Below and above these gestational ages, completeness was lower. Infants missing in SNQ were term or near-term in 99% of the cases, and their diagnoses indicated conditions managed in maternity units, or re-admissions for acute infections, managed in paediatric units. For most diagnoses, the agreement between SNQ and population registers was high, but some (bronchopulmonary dysplasia and grade of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy) were often missing in the population registers. Conclusion: SNQ completeness and agreement against other registers, especially for preterm infants, is excellent. SNQ is a valid tool for benchmarking, quality improvement and research.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Completeness, Newborn infant, Quality of neonatal care, Register, Validation
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85066040317
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1111/apa.14823
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
32b088eb-6150-4208-a88e-36343072f5a5
date added to LUP
2019-06-17 14:56:50
date last changed
2019-07-21 05:18:20
@article{32b088eb-6150-4208-a88e-36343072f5a5,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers. Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers’ agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years. Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24–34, completeness of SNQ was 98–99%. Below and above these gestational ages, completeness was lower. Infants missing in SNQ were term or near-term in 99% of the cases, and their diagnoses indicated conditions managed in maternity units, or re-admissions for acute infections, managed in paediatric units. For most diagnoses, the agreement between SNQ and population registers was high, but some (bronchopulmonary dysplasia and grade of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy) were often missing in the population registers. Conclusion: SNQ completeness and agreement against other registers, especially for preterm infants, is excellent. SNQ is a valid tool for benchmarking, quality improvement and research.</p>},
  author       = {,  and Norman, Mikael and Källén, Karin and Wahlström, Erik and Håkansson, Stellan},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  keyword      = {Completeness,Newborn infant,Quality of neonatal care,Register,Validation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register – contents, completeness and validity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.14823},
  year         = {2019},
}