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Effect of pH and sodium chloride on wheat flour dough properties: Ultracentrifugation and rheological measurements

Larsson, Helena LU (2002) In Cereal Chemistry 79(4). p.544-545
Abstract
Salt linkages, electrostatic effects, and modified water structure are important for the properties of gluten, wheat flour dough, and baking (Belitz et al 1986). These effects have been studied at various levels of salt concentration, pH, and ion strength (Doguchi and Hlynka 1967; Salovaara 1982; Kinsella and Hale 1984; Holmes and Hoseney 1987 Preston 1989; He et al 1992). Sodium chloride usually shows a strengthening effect on dough properties and a decrease in farinograph absorption (Salovaara 1982; Preston 1989). The opposite effect was found for chaotropic anions at higher salt concentrations, when the effect of neutral salts of the lyotropic series was investigated (Kinsella and Hale 1984; Preston 1989). In baking experiments, these... (More)
Salt linkages, electrostatic effects, and modified water structure are important for the properties of gluten, wheat flour dough, and baking (Belitz et al 1986). These effects have been studied at various levels of salt concentration, pH, and ion strength (Doguchi and Hlynka 1967; Salovaara 1982; Kinsella and Hale 1984; Holmes and Hoseney 1987 Preston 1989; He et al 1992). Sodium chloride usually shows a strengthening effect on dough properties and a decrease in farinograph absorption (Salovaara 1982; Preston 1989). The opposite effect was found for chaotropic anions at higher salt concentrations, when the effect of neutral salts of the lyotropic series was investigated (Kinsella and Hale 1984; Preston 1989). In baking experiments, these effects are not always observed, probably due to the adjustment of water content to a constant dough mixing resistance (Salovaara 1982). On the other hand, improved baking quality for sodium chloride supplemented doughs has been reported (He et al 1992). Doguchi (1967) reported a linear and moderately increasing relationship between farinograph maximum consistency of Gluten and pH (4.5-6.0). In a later study, the loaf volume of baked bread also increased over the same pH region but decreased at higher pH values (Holmes and Hoseney 1987). Earlier studies showed that the fractions obtained by Ultracentrifugation of dough are sensitive to wheat cultivar, dough water content (Larsson and Eliasson 1996a), mixing time. ascorbic acid, and lipid content (Larsson and Eliasson 1996b). In the present study, the effect on dough properties of sodium chloride at concentrations related to baking and the effect of pH related to those observed in dough prepared with sour dough are reported. Dough properties are characterized by the fractionation of dough in ultracentrifugation and rheological measurements at small oscillating deformation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cereal Chemistry
volume
79
issue
4
pages
544 - 545
publisher
American Association of Cereal Chemists
external identifiers
  • wos:000176844100014
  • scopus:0036065378
ISSN
0009-0352
DOI
10.1094/CCHEM.2002.79.4.544
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df1ed944-682c-47a1-ad5f-66b11c583f71 (old id 333390)
date added to LUP
2007-11-23 11:44:35
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:37:50
@article{df1ed944-682c-47a1-ad5f-66b11c583f71,
  abstract     = {Salt linkages, electrostatic effects, and modified water structure are important for the properties of gluten, wheat flour dough, and baking (Belitz et al 1986). These effects have been studied at various levels of salt concentration, pH, and ion strength (Doguchi and Hlynka 1967; Salovaara 1982; Kinsella and Hale 1984; Holmes and Hoseney 1987 Preston 1989; He et al 1992). Sodium chloride usually shows a strengthening effect on dough properties and a decrease in farinograph absorption (Salovaara 1982; Preston 1989). The opposite effect was found for chaotropic anions at higher salt concentrations, when the effect of neutral salts of the lyotropic series was investigated (Kinsella and Hale 1984; Preston 1989). In baking experiments, these effects are not always observed, probably due to the adjustment of water content to a constant dough mixing resistance (Salovaara 1982). On the other hand, improved baking quality for sodium chloride supplemented doughs has been reported (He et al 1992). Doguchi (1967) reported a linear and moderately increasing relationship between farinograph maximum consistency of Gluten and pH (4.5-6.0). In a later study, the loaf volume of baked bread also increased over the same pH region but decreased at higher pH values (Holmes and Hoseney 1987). Earlier studies showed that the fractions obtained by Ultracentrifugation of dough are sensitive to wheat cultivar, dough water content (Larsson and Eliasson 1996a), mixing time. ascorbic acid, and lipid content (Larsson and Eliasson 1996b). In the present study, the effect on dough properties of sodium chloride at concentrations related to baking and the effect of pH related to those observed in dough prepared with sour dough are reported. Dough properties are characterized by the fractionation of dough in ultracentrifugation and rheological measurements at small oscillating deformation.},
  author       = {Larsson, Helena},
  issn         = {0009-0352},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {544--545},
  publisher    = {American Association of Cereal Chemists},
  series       = {Cereal Chemistry},
  title        = {Effect of pH and sodium chloride on wheat flour dough properties: Ultracentrifugation and rheological measurements},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/CCHEM.2002.79.4.544},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2002},
}