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Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Liu, Xiangdong LU ; Ji, Jianguang LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In European Respiratory Journal 40(6). p.1489-1495
Abstract
Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and... (More)
Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Comorbidity, immune disturbance, prognosis, risk, treatment
in
European Respiratory Journal
volume
40
issue
6
pages
1489 - 1495
publisher
Eur Respiratory Soc
external identifiers
  • wos:000312055200024
  • scopus:84867683493
ISSN
1399-3003
DOI
10.1183/09031936.00222911
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
28990432-24c6-42a8-92a4-d03ebb7e7516 (old id 3372431)
date added to LUP
2013-02-01 06:59:37
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:19:40
@article{28990432-24c6-42a8-92a4-d03ebb7e7516,
  abstract     = {Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Liu, Xiangdong and Ji, Jianguang and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1399-3003},
  keyword      = {Comorbidity,immune disturbance,prognosis,risk,treatment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1489--1495},
  publisher    = {Eur Respiratory Soc},
  series       = {European Respiratory Journal},
  title        = {Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00222911},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2012},
}