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The Significance of Emulation in the Oral Interaction Between Teacher and Students

Kindeberg, Tina LU (2013) In Journal of Philosophy of Education 47(1). p.99-111
Abstract
The lack of attention to the role of emotions generally has

led modern learning theories to neglect the importance of

emulation as a pedagogical support to students’ learning.

One reason could be that the influence of teacher personality

is not considered in relation to learning outcome. Another

reason may be that the concept of emulation has been used

as a psychological conception for one-way transmission.

From a pedagogical rhetorical perspective, it is here argued

that emulation and its pedagogical function is rooted in three

human conditions: the biological, moral and political. The

framework for this reasoning is discussed, as well as

... (More)
The lack of attention to the role of emotions generally has

led modern learning theories to neglect the importance of

emulation as a pedagogical support to students’ learning.

One reason could be that the influence of teacher personality

is not considered in relation to learning outcome. Another

reason may be that the concept of emulation has been used

as a psychological conception for one-way transmission.

From a pedagogical rhetorical perspective, it is here argued

that emulation and its pedagogical function is rooted in three

human conditions: the biological, moral and political. The

framework for this reasoning is discussed, as well as

historical changes in pedagogical focus. Finally, it is

concluded that the educative character of the teacher has a

crucial impact on how willing students are to interact and

share the teachers’ knowledge, skills and values. Therefore,

there is a need for a greater awareness of these aspects to be

developed among teachers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Philosophy of Education
volume
47
issue
1
pages
99 - 111
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000315861300009
  • scopus:84874671393
ISSN
1467-9752
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9752.2012.00886.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c3f8b665-2cc6-43d8-b3cf-19e4f88ef4eb (old id 3563886)
date added to LUP
2013-03-13 12:54:48
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:05:41
@article{c3f8b665-2cc6-43d8-b3cf-19e4f88ef4eb,
  abstract     = {The lack of attention to the role of emotions generally has<br/><br>
led modern learning theories to neglect the importance of<br/><br>
emulation as a pedagogical support to students’ learning.<br/><br>
One reason could be that the influence of teacher personality<br/><br>
is not considered in relation to learning outcome. Another<br/><br>
reason may be that the concept of emulation has been used<br/><br>
as a psychological conception for one-way transmission.<br/><br>
From a pedagogical rhetorical perspective, it is here argued<br/><br>
that emulation and its pedagogical function is rooted in three<br/><br>
human conditions: the biological, moral and political. The<br/><br>
framework for this reasoning is discussed, as well as<br/><br>
historical changes in pedagogical focus. Finally, it is<br/><br>
concluded that the educative character of the teacher has a<br/><br>
crucial impact on how willing students are to interact and<br/><br>
share the teachers’ knowledge, skills and values. Therefore,<br/><br>
there is a need for a greater awareness of these aspects to be<br/><br>
developed among teachers.},
  author       = {Kindeberg, Tina},
  issn         = {1467-9752},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {99--111},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Philosophy of Education},
  title        = {The Significance of Emulation in the Oral Interaction Between Teacher and Students},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.2012.00886.x},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2013},
}