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Predicting what the future will taste like : Affective forecasting in chimpanzees

Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina LU and Persson, Tomas LU (2017) In Animal Cognition
Abstract
Being able to predict the hedonic outcomes of never-before experienced situations, by flexibly integrating relevant memories from previously experienced situations into potential future scenarios, confers the adaptive advantage of preventing the costly consequences of trial-and-error. Known as affective forecasting, this ability has been postulated as uniquely human. In a recent study, however, we devised a new behavioural task for probing affective forecasting in nonverbal subjects and found evidence of its presence in a Sumatran orangutan. The task relied on gustatory stimuli and required the participants (one orangutan and 10 humans) to make prediction based decisions concerning never-before experienced juice mixes obtained from... (More)
Being able to predict the hedonic outcomes of never-before experienced situations, by flexibly integrating relevant memories from previously experienced situations into potential future scenarios, confers the adaptive advantage of preventing the costly consequences of trial-and-error. Known as affective forecasting, this ability has been postulated as uniquely human. In a recent study, however, we devised a new behavioural task for probing affective forecasting in nonverbal subjects and found evidence of its presence in a Sumatran orangutan. The task relied on gustatory stimuli and required the participants (one orangutan and 10 humans) to make prediction based decisions concerning never-before experienced juice mixes obtained from familiar ingredient juices. In the present study we administered the same task to chimpanzees, and found their performance to be comparable to that of the previously tested participants. We also introduced a new approach for determining if subjects' choices in the test trials are based on affective forecasting. This approach, which relies on a predictive model of preference ranking for the never-before experienced mixes based on known ingredient preferences, simplifies and improves the method. The results of the study consolidate previous evidence that affective forecasting is generally present in nonhuman great apes. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
submitted
subject
keywords
decision-making, episodic memory, planning, hedonic predictions
in
Animal Cognition
publisher
Springer
ISSN
1435-9456
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
368dac48-027e-4a3c-bd5c-94e5ac8d1608
date added to LUP
2017-09-26 13:40:29
date last changed
2017-10-30 07:38:00
@article{368dac48-027e-4a3c-bd5c-94e5ac8d1608,
  abstract     = {Being able to predict the hedonic outcomes of never-before experienced situations, by flexibly integrating relevant memories from previously experienced situations into potential future scenarios, confers the adaptive advantage of preventing the costly consequences of trial-and-error. Known as affective forecasting, this ability has been postulated as uniquely human. In a recent study, however, we devised a new behavioural task for probing affective forecasting in nonverbal subjects and found evidence of its presence in a Sumatran orangutan. The task relied on gustatory stimuli and required the participants (one orangutan and 10 humans) to make prediction based decisions concerning never-before experienced juice mixes obtained from familiar ingredient juices. In the present study we administered the same task to chimpanzees, and found their performance to be comparable to that of the previously tested participants. We also introduced a new approach for determining if subjects' choices in the test trials are based on affective forecasting. This approach, which relies on a predictive model of preference ranking for the never-before experienced mixes based on known ingredient preferences, simplifies and improves the method. The results of the study consolidate previous evidence that affective forecasting is generally present in nonhuman great apes.},
  author       = {Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina and Persson, Tomas},
  issn         = {1435-9456},
  keyword      = {decision-making,episodic memory,planning,hedonic predictions},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Animal Cognition},
  title        = {Predicting what the future will taste like : Affective forecasting in chimpanzees},
  year         = {2017},
}