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First-pass metabolism limits the intestinal absorption of enteral alpha-ketoglutarate in young pigs

Lambert, Barry D. ; Filip, Rafal ; Stoll, Barbara ; Junghans, Peter ; Derno, Michael ; Hennig, Ulf ; Souffrant, Wolfgang B. ; Pierzynowski, Stefan LU and Burrin, Douglas G. (2006) In Journal of Nutrition 136(11). p.2779-2784
Abstract
Our results in a previous study indicated that the portal absorption of intragastrically fed alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) was limited in young pigs. Our aim was to quantify the net portal absorption, first-pass metabolism, and whole-body flux of enterally infused AKG. In study 1, we quantified the net portal nutrient absorption in young pigs (n = 9) given an intraduodenal infusion of milk replacer [10 mL/(kg . h)] and either saline (control) or 930 mu mol/(kg . h) AKG for 4 h. In study 2, we quantified the luminal disappearance of a duodenal AKG bolus in young pigs (n = 7). In study 3, we quantified the whole-body kinetics of C-13-AKG metabolism when infused either enterally (n = 9) or intravenously (n = 9) in young pigs. In study 1, when... (More)
Our results in a previous study indicated that the portal absorption of intragastrically fed alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) was limited in young pigs. Our aim was to quantify the net portal absorption, first-pass metabolism, and whole-body flux of enterally infused AKG. In study 1, we quantified the net portal nutrient absorption in young pigs (n = 9) given an intraduodenal infusion of milk replacer [10 mL/(kg . h)] and either saline (control) or 930 mu mol/(kg . h) AKG for 4 h. In study 2, we quantified the luminal disappearance of a duodenal AKG bolus in young pigs (n = 7). In study 3, we quantified the whole-body kinetics of C-13-AKG metabolism when infused either enterally (n = 9) or intravenously (n = 9) in young pigs. In study 1, when compared with the control group, enteral AKG infusion increased (P < 0.01) the arterial (13.8 +/- 1.7 vs. 27.4 +/- 3.6 mu mol/L) and portal (22.0 +/- 1.4 vs. 64.6 +/- 5.9 mu mol/L) AKG concentrations and the net portal absorption of AKG [19.7 +/- 2.8 vs. 95.2 +/- 12.0 mu mol/(kg . h)]. The mean fractional portal appearance of enterally infused AKG was 10.23 +/- 1.3%. In study 2, the luminal disappearance of AKG was 663 mu mol/(kg . h), representing 63% of the intraduodenal dose. In study 3, the whole-body C-13-AKG flux [4685 +/- 666 vs. 801 +/- 67 mu mol/(kg . h)] was higher (P < 0.05) when given enterally than intravenously, but (CO2)-C-13 recovery was not different (37.3 +/- 1.0 vs. 36.2 +/- 0.7% dose). The first-pass splanchnic C-13-AKG utilization was similar to 80%, of which 30% was oxidized to (CO2)-C-13. We conclude that the intestinal absorption of AKG is limited in young pigs largely due to substantial first-pass gastrointestinal metabolism. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
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in
Journal of Nutrition
volume
136
issue
11
pages
2779 - 2784
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000241649000011
  • scopus:33751090478
ISSN
1541-6100
language
English
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yes
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fbcfdb0f-62e7-44a4-b283-e483e9b41d06 (old id 378770)
alternative location
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/136/11/2779
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:21:10
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2020-08-19 03:21:45
@article{fbcfdb0f-62e7-44a4-b283-e483e9b41d06,
  abstract     = {Our results in a previous study indicated that the portal absorption of intragastrically fed alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) was limited in young pigs. Our aim was to quantify the net portal absorption, first-pass metabolism, and whole-body flux of enterally infused AKG. In study 1, we quantified the net portal nutrient absorption in young pigs (n = 9) given an intraduodenal infusion of milk replacer [10 mL/(kg . h)] and either saline (control) or 930 mu mol/(kg . h) AKG for 4 h. In study 2, we quantified the luminal disappearance of a duodenal AKG bolus in young pigs (n = 7). In study 3, we quantified the whole-body kinetics of C-13-AKG metabolism when infused either enterally (n = 9) or intravenously (n = 9) in young pigs. In study 1, when compared with the control group, enteral AKG infusion increased (P &lt; 0.01) the arterial (13.8 +/- 1.7 vs. 27.4 +/- 3.6 mu mol/L) and portal (22.0 +/- 1.4 vs. 64.6 +/- 5.9 mu mol/L) AKG concentrations and the net portal absorption of AKG [19.7 +/- 2.8 vs. 95.2 +/- 12.0 mu mol/(kg . h)]. The mean fractional portal appearance of enterally infused AKG was 10.23 +/- 1.3%. In study 2, the luminal disappearance of AKG was 663 mu mol/(kg . h), representing 63% of the intraduodenal dose. In study 3, the whole-body C-13-AKG flux [4685 +/- 666 vs. 801 +/- 67 mu mol/(kg . h)] was higher (P &lt; 0.05) when given enterally than intravenously, but (CO2)-C-13 recovery was not different (37.3 +/- 1.0 vs. 36.2 +/- 0.7% dose). The first-pass splanchnic C-13-AKG utilization was similar to 80%, of which 30% was oxidized to (CO2)-C-13. We conclude that the intestinal absorption of AKG is limited in young pigs largely due to substantial first-pass gastrointestinal metabolism.},
  author       = {Lambert, Barry D. and Filip, Rafal and Stoll, Barbara and Junghans, Peter and Derno, Michael and Hennig, Ulf and Souffrant, Wolfgang B. and Pierzynowski, Stefan and Burrin, Douglas G.},
  issn         = {1541-6100},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2779--2784},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Nutrition},
  title        = {First-pass metabolism limits the intestinal absorption of enteral alpha-ketoglutarate in young pigs},
  url          = {http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/136/11/2779},
  volume       = {136},
  year         = {2006},
}