Advanced

Separation of cells and proteins from fermentation broth in a shear-enhanced cross-flow ultrafiltration module as the first step in the refinement of lactic acid

Torang, A; Jönsson, Ann-Sofi LU and Zacchi, Guido LU (1999) In Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology 76(2). p.143-157
Abstract
A shear-enhanced, cross-flow ultrafiltration module was used to separate cells and proteins from the fermentation broth. Three (fermented) media were studied: rich medium, rich medium with hydrolytic enzymes added after fermentation, and wheat flour hydrolysate. To find a membrane with as high a flux as possible, but still capable of separating cells and proteins from the lactic acid containing broth, the performance of three hydrophilic membranes of varying cutoffs (10,000, 20,000, and 30,000) and one hydrophobic membrane (cutoff 25,000) was investigated. The proteins produced by the lactic acid bacteria during fermentation and the hydrolytic proteins were retained by the hydrophilic membrane with a cutoff of 20,000, whereas wheat flour... (More)
A shear-enhanced, cross-flow ultrafiltration module was used to separate cells and proteins from the fermentation broth. Three (fermented) media were studied: rich medium, rich medium with hydrolytic enzymes added after fermentation, and wheat flour hydrolysate. To find a membrane with as high a flux as possible, but still capable of separating cells and proteins from the lactic acid containing broth, the performance of three hydrophilic membranes of varying cutoffs (10,000, 20,000, and 30,000) and one hydrophobic membrane (cutoff 25,000) was investigated. The proteins produced by the lactic acid bacteria during fermentation and the hydrolytic proteins were retained by the hydrophilic membrane with a cutoff of 20,000, whereas wheat flour proteins were detected in the permeate. Ln the permeates from the hydrophobic membrane (cutoff 25,000), almost no proteins were detected. The flux of the whole-wheat flour hydrolysate was significantly lower than that of rich medium, for both the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic membranes. The flux was, in all cases, higher for the hydrophilic membrane (12-85 L/[m2.h], depending on which medium was treated) than for the hydrophobic one (8-45 L/[m(2) h]), even though the nominal cutoffs of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes were almost the same. However, the difference in flux was smaller when the whole-wheat flour hydrolysate was processed (12 vs 8 L/[m(2).h]) than when the rich medium was processed (85 vs 45 L/[m(2./)h]). Protein retention was higher for the hydrophobic membrane than for the hydrophilic membrane (cutoff 20,000) owing to blocking of the pores by proteins adsorbed on to the hydrophobic membrane surface. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lactic acid, membrane, separation, ultrafiltration, wheat flour
in
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
volume
76
issue
2
pages
143 - 157
publisher
Humana Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000080313600007
  • scopus:0032945957
ISSN
1559-0291
DOI
10.1385/ABAB:76:2:143
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fda25aaf-ab0b-4645-97f2-dd9918ae0ed3 (old id 3911410)
date added to LUP
2013-06-28 14:24:27
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:51:32
@article{fda25aaf-ab0b-4645-97f2-dd9918ae0ed3,
  abstract     = {A shear-enhanced, cross-flow ultrafiltration module was used to separate cells and proteins from the fermentation broth. Three (fermented) media were studied: rich medium, rich medium with hydrolytic enzymes added after fermentation, and wheat flour hydrolysate. To find a membrane with as high a flux as possible, but still capable of separating cells and proteins from the lactic acid containing broth, the performance of three hydrophilic membranes of varying cutoffs (10,000, 20,000, and 30,000) and one hydrophobic membrane (cutoff 25,000) was investigated. The proteins produced by the lactic acid bacteria during fermentation and the hydrolytic proteins were retained by the hydrophilic membrane with a cutoff of 20,000, whereas wheat flour proteins were detected in the permeate. Ln the permeates from the hydrophobic membrane (cutoff 25,000), almost no proteins were detected. The flux of the whole-wheat flour hydrolysate was significantly lower than that of rich medium, for both the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic membranes. The flux was, in all cases, higher for the hydrophilic membrane (12-85 L/[m2.h], depending on which medium was treated) than for the hydrophobic one (8-45 L/[m(2) h]), even though the nominal cutoffs of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes were almost the same. However, the difference in flux was smaller when the whole-wheat flour hydrolysate was processed (12 vs 8 L/[m(2).h]) than when the rich medium was processed (85 vs 45 L/[m(2./)h]). Protein retention was higher for the hydrophobic membrane than for the hydrophilic membrane (cutoff 20,000) owing to blocking of the pores by proteins adsorbed on to the hydrophobic membrane surface.},
  author       = {Torang, A and Jönsson, Ann-Sofi and Zacchi, Guido},
  issn         = {1559-0291},
  keyword      = {lactic acid,membrane,separation,ultrafiltration,wheat flour},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {143--157},
  publisher    = {Humana Press},
  series       = {Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology},
  title        = {Separation of cells and proteins from fermentation broth in a shear-enhanced cross-flow ultrafiltration module as the first step in the refinement of lactic acid},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ABAB:76:2:143},
  volume       = {76},
  year         = {1999},
}