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Analysis of User Demand Patterns and Locality for Youtube traffic

Arvidsson, Åke; Du, Manxing LU ; Aurelius, Andreas and Kihl, Maria LU (2013) 25th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 2013) In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
Video content constitutes a large share of residential

Internet traffic. The major source of video content as of today is

YouTube. In this paper, we analyse the user demand patterns for

YouTube in two metropolitan access networks with more than 1

million requests over three consecutive weeks in the first network

and more than 600,000 requests over four consecutive weeks in

the second network.

In particular we examine the existence of “local interest

communities”, i.e. the extent to which users living closer to each

other tend to request the same content to a higher degree, and

it is found that this applies to (i) the two networks themselves;

... (More)
Video content constitutes a large share of residential

Internet traffic. The major source of video content as of today is

YouTube. In this paper, we analyse the user demand patterns for

YouTube in two metropolitan access networks with more than 1

million requests over three consecutive weeks in the first network

and more than 600,000 requests over four consecutive weeks in

the second network.

In particular we examine the existence of “local interest

communities”, i.e. the extent to which users living closer to each

other tend to request the same content to a higher degree, and

it is found that this applies to (i) the two networks themselves;

(ii) regions within these networks (iii) housholds with regions

and (iv) terminals within households. We also find that different

types of access devices (PCs and handhelds) tend to form similar

interest communities.

It is also found that repeats are (i) “self-generating” in the

sense that the more times a clip has been played, the higher the

probability of playing it again, (ii) “long-lasting” in the sense

that repeats can occur even after several days and (iii) “semiregular”

in the sense that replays have a noticeable tendency to

occur with relatively constant intervals.

The implications of these findings are that the benefits from

large groups of users in terms of caching gain may be exaggerated,

since users are different depending on where they live and

what equipment they use, and that high gains can be achieved

in relatively small groups or even for individual users thanks to

their relatively predicatable behaviour. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
[Host publication title missing]
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
conference name
25th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 2013)
external identifiers
  • scopus:84892655324
project
EIT_EFRAIM Eco system for future media distribution
LCCC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8dead651-d0ad-4e75-83db-ecb18ab1a3be (old id 3957518)
date added to LUP
2013-08-05 13:35:47
date last changed
2017-07-30 05:01:20
@inproceedings{8dead651-d0ad-4e75-83db-ecb18ab1a3be,
  abstract     = {Video content constitutes a large share of residential<br/><br>
Internet traffic. The major source of video content as of today is<br/><br>
YouTube. In this paper, we analyse the user demand patterns for<br/><br>
YouTube in two metropolitan access networks with more than 1<br/><br>
million requests over three consecutive weeks in the first network<br/><br>
and more than 600,000 requests over four consecutive weeks in<br/><br>
the second network.<br/><br>
In particular we examine the existence of “local interest<br/><br>
communities”, i.e. the extent to which users living closer to each<br/><br>
other tend to request the same content to a higher degree, and<br/><br>
it is found that this applies to (i) the two networks themselves;<br/><br>
(ii) regions within these networks (iii) housholds with regions<br/><br>
and (iv) terminals within households. We also find that different<br/><br>
types of access devices (PCs and handhelds) tend to form similar<br/><br>
interest communities.<br/><br>
It is also found that repeats are (i) “self-generating” in the<br/><br>
sense that the more times a clip has been played, the higher the<br/><br>
probability of playing it again, (ii) “long-lasting” in the sense<br/><br>
that repeats can occur even after several days and (iii) “semiregular”<br/><br>
in the sense that replays have a noticeable tendency to<br/><br>
occur with relatively constant intervals.<br/><br>
The implications of these findings are that the benefits from<br/><br>
large groups of users in terms of caching gain may be exaggerated,<br/><br>
since users are different depending on where they live and<br/><br>
what equipment they use, and that high gains can be achieved<br/><br>
in relatively small groups or even for individual users thanks to<br/><br>
their relatively predicatable behaviour.},
  author       = {Arvidsson, Åke and Du, Manxing and Aurelius, Andreas and Kihl, Maria},
  booktitle    = {[Host publication title missing]},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.},
  title        = {Analysis of User Demand Patterns and Locality for Youtube traffic},
  year         = {2013},
}