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What about gender in climate change? Twelve feminist lessons from development

Jerneck, Anne LU (2018) In Sustainability (Switzerland) 10(3).
Abstract

Adaptation and mitigation are two key responses to climate change. In the global South; they prompt many questions: what is the direction and degree of change needed; how can new climate change policies be aligned with existing development initiatives; and how are core social relations such as gender understood and prioritized in relation to technical; and other; solutions? In search of synergies between adaptation; development and mitigation; this article asks a pertinent question for sub-Saharan small-scale agriculture in particular: what can adaptation and mitigation learn from development debates on social goal setting; institutional change; and gender equality? From the perspective of sustainability science and feminist literature;... (More)

Adaptation and mitigation are two key responses to climate change. In the global South; they prompt many questions: what is the direction and degree of change needed; how can new climate change policies be aligned with existing development initiatives; and how are core social relations such as gender understood and prioritized in relation to technical; and other; solutions? In search of synergies between adaptation; development and mitigation; this article asks a pertinent question for sub-Saharan small-scale agriculture in particular: what can adaptation and mitigation learn from development debates on social goal setting; institutional change; and gender equality? From the perspective of sustainability science and feminist literature; three main findings emerge. First, as regards social goal setting; adaptation and mitigation should; like development; support the escape out of poverty; ill-health; and food-insecurity. Second, as regards institutions; adaptation and mitigation should address how gender regulates access to; use of; and control over resources in terms of labor; land; and strategic decision-making power. Third, as regards gender equality; adaptation and mitigation should learn from how development in theory and practice has addressed gender; women; nature; and the environment. At its core; the analysis contributes twelve salient themes that can significantly inform adaptation and mitigation in research; policy and practice; thus, serving as inspiration for a critical debate on much needed synergetic trajectories.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adaptation, Climate change, Development, Environment, Gender, Sustainability science
in
Sustainability (Switzerland)
volume
10
issue
3
publisher
Formas
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042566895
ISSN
2071-1050
DOI
10.3390/su10030627
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3a327b4d-d397-49f7-949b-329f01cfb3e9
date added to LUP
2018-03-08 10:43:07
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:07:33
@article{3a327b4d-d397-49f7-949b-329f01cfb3e9,
  abstract     = {<p>Adaptation and mitigation are two key responses to climate change. In the global South; they prompt many questions: what is the direction and degree of change needed; how can new climate change policies be aligned with existing development initiatives; and how are core social relations such as gender understood and prioritized in relation to technical; and other; solutions? In search of synergies between adaptation; development and mitigation; this article asks a pertinent question for sub-Saharan small-scale agriculture in particular: what can adaptation and mitigation learn from development debates on social goal setting; institutional change; and gender equality? From the perspective of sustainability science and feminist literature; three main findings emerge. First, as regards social goal setting; adaptation and mitigation should; like development; support the escape out of poverty; ill-health; and food-insecurity. Second, as regards institutions; adaptation and mitigation should address how gender regulates access to; use of; and control over resources in terms of labor; land; and strategic decision-making power. Third, as regards gender equality; adaptation and mitigation should learn from how development in theory and practice has addressed gender; women; nature; and the environment. At its core; the analysis contributes twelve salient themes that can significantly inform adaptation and mitigation in research; policy and practice; thus, serving as inspiration for a critical debate on much needed synergetic trajectories.</p>},
  articleno    = {627},
  author       = {Jerneck, Anne},
  issn         = {2071-1050},
  keyword      = {Adaptation,Climate change,Development,Environment,Gender,Sustainability science},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {3},
  publisher    = {Formas},
  series       = {Sustainability (Switzerland)},
  title        = {What about gender in climate change? Twelve feminist lessons from development},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su10030627},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2018},
}