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High blood glucose levels are associated with higher risk of colon cancer in men : A cohort study

Vulcan, Alexandra LU ; Manjer, Jonas LU and Ohlsson, Bodil LU (2017) In BMC Cancer 17(1).
Abstract

Background: High levels of blood glucose are thought to be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and hyperinsulinemia, an interstage in the development of CRC. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between incident CRC and blood glucose; plasma insulin; and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR), respectively, and to determine whether these associations were dependent on sex and cancer site. Methods: The Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort comprises 6103 individuals. During 81,781 person-years of follow-up, 145 cases of CRC were identified. The hazard ratio of measured blood glucose and plasma insulin and calculated HOMA2-IR were estimated with Cox proportional hazard regression.... (More)

Background: High levels of blood glucose are thought to be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and hyperinsulinemia, an interstage in the development of CRC. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between incident CRC and blood glucose; plasma insulin; and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR), respectively, and to determine whether these associations were dependent on sex and cancer site. Methods: The Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort comprises 6103 individuals. During 81,781 person-years of follow-up, 145 cases of CRC were identified. The hazard ratio of measured blood glucose and plasma insulin and calculated HOMA2-IR were estimated with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: An association was found between high levels of blood glucose and risk of CRC (HR: 1.72 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.05, 2.84; ptrend=0.044), and colon cancer (HR: 1.70 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 0.87, 3.33; ptrend=0.032). In men, an association was found between blood glucose and CRC (HR: 2.80 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.37, 5.70; ptrend=0.001), and colon cancer (HR: 4.48 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.27, 15.84; ptrend=0.007), but this was not found in women. No associations between plasma insulin, or HOMA2-IR, and CRC, were found. Conclusion: High levels of blood glucose in men are associated with risk of colon cancer. The findings contribute to facilitating to identify those most in need of prevention and screening.

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author
organization
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type
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Blood glucose, Colorectal cancer (CRC), Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR), Malmö diet and cancer study, Plasma insulin, Sex
in
BMC Cancer
volume
17
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85038029910
  • wos:000417899100003
ISSN
1471-2407
DOI
10.1186/s12885-017-3874-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3cbc84de-2161-4873-bbea-af8bbc0d70d4
date added to LUP
2018-01-04 12:11:28
date last changed
2018-04-06 03:00:14
@article{3cbc84de-2161-4873-bbea-af8bbc0d70d4,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: High levels of blood glucose are thought to be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and hyperinsulinemia, an interstage in the development of CRC. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between incident CRC and blood glucose; plasma insulin; and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR), respectively, and to determine whether these associations were dependent on sex and cancer site. Methods: The Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort comprises 6103 individuals. During 81,781 person-years of follow-up, 145 cases of CRC were identified. The hazard ratio of measured blood glucose and plasma insulin and calculated HOMA2-IR were estimated with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: An association was found between high levels of blood glucose and risk of CRC (HR: 1.72 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.05, 2.84; p<sub>trend</sub>=0.044), and colon cancer (HR: 1.70 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 0.87, 3.33; p<sub>trend</sub>=0.032). In men, an association was found between blood glucose and CRC (HR: 2.80 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.37, 5.70; p<sub>trend</sub>=0.001), and colon cancer (HR: 4.48 for the highest compared with the lowest quartile 95% CI: 1.27, 15.84; p<sub>trend</sub>=0.007), but this was not found in women. No associations between plasma insulin, or HOMA2-IR, and CRC, were found. Conclusion: High levels of blood glucose in men are associated with risk of colon cancer. The findings contribute to facilitating to identify those most in need of prevention and screening.</p>},
  articleno    = {842},
  author       = {Vulcan, Alexandra and Manjer, Jonas and Ohlsson, Bodil},
  issn         = {1471-2407},
  keyword      = {Blood glucose,Colorectal cancer (CRC),Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR),Malmö diet and cancer study,Plasma insulin,Sex},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Cancer},
  title        = {High blood glucose levels are associated with higher risk of colon cancer in men : A cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-017-3874-4},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2017},
}