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Familial Associations Between Prostate Cancer and Other Cancers

Frank, Christoph LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Hemminki, Akseli and Hemminki, Kari LU (2017) In European Urology 71(2). p.162-165
Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) has a large familial component, but understanding of its genetic basis is fragmentary. Breast cancers may be associated with PCa, but whether this is true for other tumor types is poorly established. We used a novel approach to study familial associations of any type of cancer with PCa. We assessed the relative risk (RR) for all types of tumors as a function of the number of first-degree relatives diagnosed with PCa. We hypothesized that for a familial association to be real, the RR for a given type of cancer should increase with the number of PCa diagnoses. In families with multiple PCa patients, significantly increased risks were observed for female breast cancer (RR 1.37 for families with three men with PCa),... (More)

Prostate cancer (PCa) has a large familial component, but understanding of its genetic basis is fragmentary. Breast cancers may be associated with PCa, but whether this is true for other tumor types is poorly established. We used a novel approach to study familial associations of any type of cancer with PCa. We assessed the relative risk (RR) for all types of tumors as a function of the number of first-degree relatives diagnosed with PCa. We hypothesized that for a familial association to be real, the RR for a given type of cancer should increase with the number of PCa diagnoses. In families with multiple PCa patients, significantly increased risks were observed for female breast cancer (RR 1.37 for families with three men with PCa), kidney cancer (RR 2.32), nervous system tumors (RR 1.77; RR 2.40 when PCa was diagnosed before age 70 yr), and myeloma (RR 2.44; RR 6.29 when PCa was diagnosed before age 70 yr). Some evidence of association was also found for melanoma (RR 1.82) and endocrine tumors (RR 2.18). The consistency and magnitude of the effects suggest that familial PCa is genetically associated with breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma. This suggestion has implications for clinical counseling and design of genetic studies. Patient summary: It is known that prostate cancer runs in families, but it is not known whether other cancers are common in such families. We showed that at least breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma occur more often than by chance. The present results demonstrate that prostate cancer (PCa) families show a statistical excess of some defined cancers. The cancers associated with PCa include breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma and possibly melanoma and endocrine tumors.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Discordant cancer, Familial cancer, Familial risk, Genetic association
in
European Urology
volume
71
issue
2
pages
162 - 165
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84998693291
  • wos:000390565700025
ISSN
0302-2838
DOI
10.1016/j.eururo.2016.07.031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3f345ec5-74ff-4b13-b9eb-7d1edba2808c
date added to LUP
2016-12-30 13:37:14
date last changed
2018-03-04 04:57:13
@article{3f345ec5-74ff-4b13-b9eb-7d1edba2808c,
  abstract     = {<p>Prostate cancer (PCa) has a large familial component, but understanding of its genetic basis is fragmentary. Breast cancers may be associated with PCa, but whether this is true for other tumor types is poorly established. We used a novel approach to study familial associations of any type of cancer with PCa. We assessed the relative risk (RR) for all types of tumors as a function of the number of first-degree relatives diagnosed with PCa. We hypothesized that for a familial association to be real, the RR for a given type of cancer should increase with the number of PCa diagnoses. In families with multiple PCa patients, significantly increased risks were observed for female breast cancer (RR 1.37 for families with three men with PCa), kidney cancer (RR 2.32), nervous system tumors (RR 1.77; RR 2.40 when PCa was diagnosed before age 70 yr), and myeloma (RR 2.44; RR 6.29 when PCa was diagnosed before age 70 yr). Some evidence of association was also found for melanoma (RR 1.82) and endocrine tumors (RR 2.18). The consistency and magnitude of the effects suggest that familial PCa is genetically associated with breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma. This suggestion has implications for clinical counseling and design of genetic studies. Patient summary: It is known that prostate cancer runs in families, but it is not known whether other cancers are common in such families. We showed that at least breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma occur more often than by chance. The present results demonstrate that prostate cancer (PCa) families show a statistical excess of some defined cancers. The cancers associated with PCa include breast, kidney, and nervous system tumors and myeloma and possibly melanoma and endocrine tumors.</p>},
  author       = {Frank, Christoph and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Akseli and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {0302-2838},
  keyword      = {Discordant cancer,Familial cancer,Familial risk,Genetic association},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {162--165},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Urology},
  title        = {Familial Associations Between Prostate Cancer and Other Cancers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eururo.2016.07.031},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2017},
}