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Sweet and fat taste preference in obesity have different associations with personality and eating behavior

Elfhag, K and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte LU (2006) In Physiology & Behavior 88(1-2). p.61-66
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test associations between self-reported attitudes of sweet and fat taste preferences and psychological constructs of eating behavior and personality in obesity. Sixty obese patients were included. The Three Factor Eating Questionnaire was used for the assessment of psychological constructs of eating behavior, and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality was used for measuring personality traits. A strong sweet taste preference was associated with more neurotic personality traits (P = .003), in particular lack of assertiveness (P = .001) and embitterment (P = .002). Strong fat taste preference was rather related to lower levels of the eating characteristic cognitive restraint (P = .017), implying less... (More)
The aim of this study was to test associations between self-reported attitudes of sweet and fat taste preferences and psychological constructs of eating behavior and personality in obesity. Sixty obese patients were included. The Three Factor Eating Questionnaire was used for the assessment of psychological constructs of eating behavior, and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality was used for measuring personality traits. A strong sweet taste preference was associated with more neurotic personality traits (P = .003), in particular lack of assertiveness (P = .001) and embitterment (P = .002). Strong fat taste preference was rather related to lower levels of the eating characteristic cognitive restraint (P = .017), implying less attempts to restrict and control food intake. Whereas strong sweet taste preference was linked to a personality style in obesity, strong fat preference could be more an aspect of eating behavior. A psychobiological stress model is discussed in relation to the results on sweet preference and hampered personality functioning. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
eating, behavior, psychology, personality, fat, sugar, taste preference, sweet
in
Physiology & Behavior
volume
88
issue
1-2
pages
61 - 66
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:16624348
  • wos:000238598900007
  • scopus:33744521563
ISSN
1873-507X
DOI
10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.03.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12399584-3de2-45ec-8046-5d12bd690eb8 (old id 404775)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:40:51
date last changed
2020-06-17 02:53:38
@article{12399584-3de2-45ec-8046-5d12bd690eb8,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to test associations between self-reported attitudes of sweet and fat taste preferences and psychological constructs of eating behavior and personality in obesity. Sixty obese patients were included. The Three Factor Eating Questionnaire was used for the assessment of psychological constructs of eating behavior, and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality was used for measuring personality traits. A strong sweet taste preference was associated with more neurotic personality traits (P = .003), in particular lack of assertiveness (P = .001) and embitterment (P = .002). Strong fat taste preference was rather related to lower levels of the eating characteristic cognitive restraint (P = .017), implying less attempts to restrict and control food intake. Whereas strong sweet taste preference was linked to a personality style in obesity, strong fat preference could be more an aspect of eating behavior. A psychobiological stress model is discussed in relation to the results on sweet preference and hampered personality functioning. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Elfhag, K and Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte},
  issn         = {1873-507X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {61--66},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Physiology & Behavior},
  title        = {Sweet and fat taste preference in obesity have different associations with personality and eating behavior},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.03.006},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.03.006},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2006},
}