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Age at first introduction to complementary foods is associated with sociodemographic factors in children with increased genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

Andrén Aronsson, Carin LU ; Uusitalo, Ulla; Vehik, Kendra LU ; Yang, Jimin; Silvis, Katherine; Hummel, Sandra; Virtanen, Suvi M and Norris, Jill M (2015) In Maternal and Child Nutrition 11(4). p.803-814
Abstract
Infant's age at introduction to certain complementary foods (CF) has in previous studies been associated with islet autoimmunity, which is an early marker for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Various maternal sociodemographic factors have been found to be associated with early introduction to CF. The aims of this study were to describe early infant feeding and identify sociodemographic factors associated with early introduction to CF in a multinational cohort of infants with an increased genetic risk for T1D. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young study is a prospective longitudinal birth cohort study. Infants (N = 6404) screened for T1D high risk human leucocyte antigen-DQ genotypes (DR3/4, DR4/4, DR4/8, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR4/1,... (More)
Infant's age at introduction to certain complementary foods (CF) has in previous studies been associated with islet autoimmunity, which is an early marker for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Various maternal sociodemographic factors have been found to be associated with early introduction to CF. The aims of this study were to describe early infant feeding and identify sociodemographic factors associated with early introduction to CF in a multinational cohort of infants with an increased genetic risk for T1D. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young study is a prospective longitudinal birth cohort study. Infants (N = 6404) screened for T1D high risk human leucocyte antigen-DQ genotypes (DR3/4, DR4/4, DR4/8, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR4/1, DR4/13, DR4/9 and DR3/9) were followed for 2 years at six clinical research centres: three in the United States (Colorado, Georgia/Florida, Washington) and three in Europe (Sweden, Finland, Germany). Age at first introduction to any food was reported at clinical visits every third month from the age of 3 months. Maternal sociodemographic data were self-reported through questionnaires. Age at first introduction to CF was primarily associated with country of residence. Root vegetables and fruits were usually the first CF introduced in Finland and Sweden and cereals were usually the first CF introduced in the United States. Between 15% and 20% of the infants were introduced to solid foods before the age of 4 months. Young maternal age (<25 years), low educational level (<12 years) and smoking during pregnancy were significant predictors of early introduction to CF in this cohort. Infants with a relative with T1D were more likely to be introduced to CF later. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Maternal and Child Nutrition
volume
11
issue
4
pages
803 - 814
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:24034553
  • wos:000362197100030
  • scopus:84942552893
ISSN
1740-8709
DOI
10.1111/mcn.12084
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7f2d5a12-4e46-435e-a495-5d96133598d8 (old id 4065877)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24034553?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-10-02 19:01:34
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:11:23
@article{7f2d5a12-4e46-435e-a495-5d96133598d8,
  abstract     = {Infant's age at introduction to certain complementary foods (CF) has in previous studies been associated with islet autoimmunity, which is an early marker for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Various maternal sociodemographic factors have been found to be associated with early introduction to CF. The aims of this study were to describe early infant feeding and identify sociodemographic factors associated with early introduction to CF in a multinational cohort of infants with an increased genetic risk for T1D. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young study is a prospective longitudinal birth cohort study. Infants (N = 6404) screened for T1D high risk human leucocyte antigen-DQ genotypes (DR3/4, DR4/4, DR4/8, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR4/1, DR4/13, DR4/9 and DR3/9) were followed for 2 years at six clinical research centres: three in the United States (Colorado, Georgia/Florida, Washington) and three in Europe (Sweden, Finland, Germany). Age at first introduction to any food was reported at clinical visits every third month from the age of 3 months. Maternal sociodemographic data were self-reported through questionnaires. Age at first introduction to CF was primarily associated with country of residence. Root vegetables and fruits were usually the first CF introduced in Finland and Sweden and cereals were usually the first CF introduced in the United States. Between 15% and 20% of the infants were introduced to solid foods before the age of 4 months. Young maternal age (&lt;25 years), low educational level (&lt;12 years) and smoking during pregnancy were significant predictors of early introduction to CF in this cohort. Infants with a relative with T1D were more likely to be introduced to CF later.},
  author       = {Andrén Aronsson, Carin and Uusitalo, Ulla and Vehik, Kendra and Yang, Jimin and Silvis, Katherine and Hummel, Sandra and Virtanen, Suvi M and Norris, Jill M},
  issn         = {1740-8709},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {803--814},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Maternal and Child Nutrition},
  title        = {Age at first introduction to complementary foods is associated with sociodemographic factors in children with increased genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12084},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2015},
}