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Enhancing crop shelf life with pollination

Klatt, Björn LU ; Klaus, Felix; Westphal, Catrin and Tscharntke, Teja (2014) In Agriculture & Food Security 3.
Abstract
Background: Globally, high amounts of food are wasted due to insufficient quality and decay. Although pollination has been shown to increase crop quality, a possible impact on shelf life has not been quantitatively studied. Results: We tested how shelf life, represented by fruit decay, firmness and weight, changes as a function of pollination limitation in two European, commercially important strawberry varieties. Pollination limitation resulted in lower amounts of deformed fruits. Whereas 65% of wind-pollinated fruits were deformed, open pollination resulted in only 20% deformed fruits. During storage, the proportion of decayed fruits increased in relation to the degree of deformation. In the variety Yamaska, 80% of the fruits with high... (More)
Background: Globally, high amounts of food are wasted due to insufficient quality and decay. Although pollination has been shown to increase crop quality, a possible impact on shelf life has not been quantitatively studied. Results: We tested how shelf life, represented by fruit decay, firmness and weight, changes as a function of pollination limitation in two European, commercially important strawberry varieties. Pollination limitation resulted in lower amounts of deformed fruits. Whereas 65% of wind-pollinated fruits were deformed, open pollination resulted in only 20% deformed fruits. During storage, the proportion of decayed fruits increased in relation to the degree of deformation. In the variety Yamaska, 80% of the fruits with high degrees of deformation decayed after four days, whereas in the variety Sonata, all highly deformed fruits had already decayed after three days. Fruit weight decreased independent from the degree of deformation. However, strongest deformations resulted in a generally lower fruit weight in Sonata, whereas in Yamaska, also medium deformed fruits had a lower weight than highly deformed fruits. Effects of deformation on firmness declines were mostly variety dependent. Whereas firmness declined similarly for all degrees of deformation for Yamaska, highly deformed fruits lost firmness fastest in Sonata. Conclusions: Our results suggest that crop pollination has the potential to reduce food loss and waste in pollinated crops and thus to contribute to global food security. However, this relationship between pollination and food waste has so far been almost completely ignored. Future pollination research should therefore focus not only on yield effects but also on crop quality. A more comprehensive understanding of how pollination can benefit global food security should lead to a more efficient crop production to help meeting future food demands. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Decay, Deformation, Food loss, Food waste, Fruit quality, Pollination limitation
in
Agriculture & Food Security
volume
3
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85006051765
ISSN
2048-7010
DOI
10.1186/2048-7010-3-14
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40ac8d86-80b0-4a83-acef-98831718c592
date added to LUP
2017-09-04 12:05:34
date last changed
2017-09-17 09:52:51
@article{40ac8d86-80b0-4a83-acef-98831718c592,
  abstract     = {Background: Globally, high amounts of food are wasted due to insufficient quality and decay. Although pollination has been shown to increase crop quality, a possible impact on shelf life has not been quantitatively studied. Results: We tested how shelf life, represented by fruit decay, firmness and weight, changes as a function of pollination limitation in two European, commercially important strawberry varieties. Pollination limitation resulted in lower amounts of deformed fruits. Whereas 65% of wind-pollinated fruits were deformed, open pollination resulted in only 20% deformed fruits. During storage, the proportion of decayed fruits increased in relation to the degree of deformation. In the variety Yamaska, 80% of the fruits with high degrees of deformation decayed after four days, whereas in the variety Sonata, all highly deformed fruits had already decayed after three days. Fruit weight decreased independent from the degree of deformation. However, strongest deformations resulted in a generally lower fruit weight in Sonata, whereas in Yamaska, also medium deformed fruits had a lower weight than highly deformed fruits. Effects of deformation on firmness declines were mostly variety dependent. Whereas firmness declined similarly for all degrees of deformation for Yamaska, highly deformed fruits lost firmness fastest in Sonata. Conclusions: Our results suggest that crop pollination has the potential to reduce food loss and waste in pollinated crops and thus to contribute to global food security. However, this relationship between pollination and food waste has so far been almost completely ignored. Future pollination research should therefore focus not only on yield effects but also on crop  quality. A more comprehensive understanding of how pollination can benefit global food security should lead to a more efficient crop production to help meeting future food demands.},
  articleno    = {3:14},
  author       = {Klatt, Björn and Klaus, Felix and Westphal, Catrin and Tscharntke, Teja},
  issn         = {2048-7010},
  keyword      = {Decay,Deformation,Food loss,Food waste,Fruit quality,Pollination limitation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Agriculture & Food Security},
  title        = {Enhancing crop shelf life with pollination},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2048-7010-3-14},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2014},
}