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Effects of different types of forensic information on eyewitness’ memory and confidence accuracy

Sarwar, Farhan LU ; Allwood, Carl Martin LU and Innes-Ker, Åse LU (2014) In The European Journal of Psychology Applied To Legal Context 6(1). p.17-27
Abstract
This study investigated eyewitnesses’ memory and confidence accuracy for action information (what happened at the crime scene), and detail information (descriptions of persons, objects, time and place). In

Experiment 1, 89 participants watched a film and participated in one of four conditions: Laboratory discussion, Family discussion, Retell and Control, the first three with five meetings each. Three weeks later all participants open free recalled the events, and confidence judged their answers. The participants showed better free recall and confidence accuracy for action than for detail information. Participants in the two discussion conditions and in the Retell condition recalled more items and those in the... (More)
This study investigated eyewitnesses’ memory and confidence accuracy for action information (what happened at the crime scene), and detail information (descriptions of persons, objects, time and place). In

Experiment 1, 89 participants watched a film and participated in one of four conditions: Laboratory discussion, Family discussion, Retell and Control, the first three with five meetings each. Three weeks later all participants open free recalled the events, and confidence judged their answers. The participants showed better free recall and confidence accuracy for action than for detail information. Participants in the two discussion conditions and in the Retell condition recalled more items and those in the Lab-discussion

and Retell conditions more correct items for action information, than those in Control group. However, the four conditions did not differ for proportion correct of all action items recalled and confidence accuracy for action items. In brief, Experiment 1 showed that witness discussions and retellings of the experienced event with others improved recall for action information but had had no, or small, effects on confidence accuracy. Experiment 2 investigated recall and confidence accuracy performance for action and detail information using focused questions. Seventy-seven participants watched a film, answered and confidence judged 63 questions about action and detail information about the events. Again, participants showed

better memory and confidence accuracy for action information. Overall, the results indicate that, for both free recall and focused questions, witnesses’ recall and confidence accuracy is better for action information than for detail information, thus extra precaution is nee

ded in the forensic system when detail information from witnesses is considered. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Memory, Focused questions, Free recall, Eyewitnesses, Confidence accuracy, Action information
in
The European Journal of Psychology Applied To Legal Context
volume
6
issue
1
pages
17 - 27
publisher
Sociedad Espanola Psicologia Juridica Forense
external identifiers
  • wos:000329080600003
  • scopus:84901191301
ISSN
1989-4007
DOI
10.5093/ejpalc2014a3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b65e649-0972-4512-b2a9-66b025c41fc9 (old id 4248099)
date added to LUP
2014-01-14 13:15:28
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:17:25
@article{1b65e649-0972-4512-b2a9-66b025c41fc9,
  abstract     = {This study investigated eyewitnesses’ memory and confidence accuracy for action information (what happened at the crime scene), and detail information (descriptions of persons, objects, time and place). In<br/><br>
Experiment 1, 89 participants watched a film and participated in one of four conditions: Laboratory discussion, Family discussion, Retell and Control, the first three with five meetings each. Three weeks later all participants open free recalled the events, and confidence judged their answers. The participants showed better free recall and confidence accuracy for action than for detail information. Participants in the two discussion conditions and in the Retell condition recalled more items and those in the Lab-discussion<br/><br>
and Retell conditions more correct items for action information, than those in Control group. However, the four conditions did not differ for proportion correct of all action items recalled and confidence accuracy for action items. In brief, Experiment 1 showed that witness discussions and retellings of the experienced event with others improved recall for action information but had had no, or small, effects on confidence accuracy. Experiment 2 investigated recall and confidence accuracy performance for action and detail information using focused questions. Seventy-seven participants watched a film, answered and confidence judged 63 questions about action and detail information about the events. Again, participants showed<br/><br>
better memory and confidence accuracy for action information. Overall, the results indicate that, for both free recall and focused questions, witnesses’ recall and confidence accuracy is better for action information than for detail information, thus extra precaution is nee<br/><br>
ded in the forensic system when detail information from witnesses is considered.},
  author       = {Sarwar, Farhan and Allwood, Carl Martin and Innes-Ker, Åse},
  issn         = {1989-4007},
  keyword      = {Memory,Focused questions,Free recall,Eyewitnesses,Confidence accuracy,Action information},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {17--27},
  publisher    = {Sociedad Espanola Psicologia Juridica Forense},
  series       = {The European Journal of Psychology Applied To Legal Context},
  title        = {Effects of different types of forensic information on eyewitness’ memory and confidence accuracy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5093/ejpalc2014a3},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2014},
}