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Children having magnetic resonance imaging: A preparatory storybook and audio/visual media are preferable to anesthesia or deep sedation.

Törnqvist, Erna LU ; Månsson, Åsa LU and Hallström, Inger LU (2015) In Journal of Child Health Care 19(3). p.359-369
Abstract
As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination lasts about 45 minutes and as the technique is sensitive to motion, children are often given sedation or anesthesia. The aim of this study was to examine whether children aged three to nine years could undergo MRI while awake and achieve adequate image quality if age-adjusted routines were used. A two-group controlled experimental design was used. Thirty-six children were assigned to a control group and underwent MRI with the prevalent routines. Thirty-three children were assigned to an intervention group and underwent the MRI while awake. The age-adjusted routine included a booklet and a story book, a model of the MRI scanner with the MRI sound, and a DVD film during the examination. In... (More)
As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination lasts about 45 minutes and as the technique is sensitive to motion, children are often given sedation or anesthesia. The aim of this study was to examine whether children aged three to nine years could undergo MRI while awake and achieve adequate image quality if age-adjusted routines were used. A two-group controlled experimental design was used. Thirty-six children were assigned to a control group and underwent MRI with the prevalent routines. Thirty-three children were assigned to an intervention group and underwent the MRI while awake. The age-adjusted routine included a booklet and a story book, a model of the MRI scanner with the MRI sound, and a DVD film during the examination. In the control group, 30 children underwent the examination under anesthesia and 6 underwent the examination while they were awake. All had acceptable examinations. In the intervention group, 33 children had their examination while awake and 30 of them had acceptable examinations. The parents' satisfaction with the care was assessed to be equal or higher in the intervention group and the costs were calculated to be lower. Thus, many children receiving age-appropriate preparation and distraction can undergo MRI examinations while awake. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Child Health Care
volume
19
issue
3
pages
359 - 369
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:24486815
  • wos:000360822100008
  • scopus:84940916225
ISSN
1741-2889
DOI
10.1177/1367493513518374
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d25613b4-8594-4e71-be8e-e6a0845c12b3 (old id 4335907)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24486815?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-03-07 13:55:16
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:24:15
@article{d25613b4-8594-4e71-be8e-e6a0845c12b3,
  abstract     = {As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination lasts about 45 minutes and as the technique is sensitive to motion, children are often given sedation or anesthesia. The aim of this study was to examine whether children aged three to nine years could undergo MRI while awake and achieve adequate image quality if age-adjusted routines were used. A two-group controlled experimental design was used. Thirty-six children were assigned to a control group and underwent MRI with the prevalent routines. Thirty-three children were assigned to an intervention group and underwent the MRI while awake. The age-adjusted routine included a booklet and a story book, a model of the MRI scanner with the MRI sound, and a DVD film during the examination. In the control group, 30 children underwent the examination under anesthesia and 6 underwent the examination while they were awake. All had acceptable examinations. In the intervention group, 33 children had their examination while awake and 30 of them had acceptable examinations. The parents' satisfaction with the care was assessed to be equal or higher in the intervention group and the costs were calculated to be lower. Thus, many children receiving age-appropriate preparation and distraction can undergo MRI examinations while awake.},
  author       = {Törnqvist, Erna and Månsson, Åsa and Hallström, Inger},
  issn         = {1741-2889},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {359--369},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Child Health Care},
  title        = {Children having magnetic resonance imaging: A preparatory storybook and audio/visual media are preferable to anesthesia or deep sedation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367493513518374},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2015},
}