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Nonword Repetition - A Clinical Marker for Specific Language Impairment in Swedish Associated with Parents' Language-Related Problems

Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans and Sahlén, Birgitta LU (2014) In PLoS ONE 9(2).
Abstract
First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedishspeaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8-12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary... (More)
First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedishspeaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8-12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of -2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d = 2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d = 1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n = 12), and those with one or both parents affected (n = 49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p =.037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d = 0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d = 2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d = 1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes of SLI. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
9
issue
2
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • wos:000331880700059
  • pmid:24586859
  • scopus:84896073216
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0089544
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
30e797c6-d998-472e-bc0f-7b50a65ecc0a (old id 4364116)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24586859?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-04-07 09:24:28
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:01:43
@article{30e797c6-d998-472e-bc0f-7b50a65ecc0a,
  abstract     = {First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedishspeaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8-12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of -2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d = 2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d = 1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n = 12), and those with one or both parents affected (n = 49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p =.037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d = 0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d = 2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d = 1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes of SLI.},
  articleno    = {e89544},
  author       = {Kalnak, Nelli and Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam and Forssberg, Hans and Sahlén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Nonword Repetition - A Clinical Marker for Specific Language Impairment in Swedish Associated with Parents' Language-Related Problems},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0089544},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}