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Human Fetal Striatum-Derived Neural Stem (NS) Cells Differentiate to Mature Neurons in Vitro and in Vivo.

Monni, Emanuela LU ; Cusulin, Carlo LU ; Cavallaro, Maurizio LU ; Lindvall, Olle LU and Kokaia, Zaal LU (2014) In Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy 9(4). p.338-346
Abstract
Clonogenic neural stem (NS) cell lines grown in adherent cultures have previously been established from embryonic stem cells and fetal and adult CNS in rodents and from human fetal brain and spinal cord. Here we describe the isolation of a new cell line from human fetal striatum (hNS cells). These cells showed properties of NS cells in vitro such as monolayer growth, high proliferation rate and expression of radial glia markers. The hNS cells expressed an early neuronal marker while being in the proliferative state. Under appropriate conditions, the hNS cells were efficiently differentiated to neurons, and after 4 weeks about 50% of the cells were III tubulin positive. They also expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and markers of... (More)
Clonogenic neural stem (NS) cell lines grown in adherent cultures have previously been established from embryonic stem cells and fetal and adult CNS in rodents and from human fetal brain and spinal cord. Here we describe the isolation of a new cell line from human fetal striatum (hNS cells). These cells showed properties of NS cells in vitro such as monolayer growth, high proliferation rate and expression of radial glia markers. The hNS cells expressed an early neuronal marker while being in the proliferative state. Under appropriate conditions, the hNS cells were efficiently differentiated to neurons, and after 4 weeks about 50% of the cells were III tubulin positive. They also expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and markers of neuronal subtypes, GABA, calbindin, and DARPP32. After intrastriatal implantation into newborn rats, the hNS cells survived and many of them migrated outside the transplant core into the surrounding tissue. A high percentage of cells in the grafts expressed the neuroblast marker DCX, indicating their neurogenic potential, and some of the cells differentiated to NeuN+ mature neurons. The human fetal striatum-derived NS cell line described here should be a useful tool for studies on cell replacement strategies in models of the striatal neuronal loss occurring in Huntington's disease and stroke. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy
volume
9
issue
4
pages
338 - 346
publisher
Bentham Science Publishers
external identifiers
  • pmid:24654649
  • wos:000335391800006
  • scopus:84904503308
ISSN
2212-3946
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
78937ebc-6827-40d7-bcf1-bfabdc535d5f (old id 4382916)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24654649?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-04-03 20:45:32
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:01:17
@article{78937ebc-6827-40d7-bcf1-bfabdc535d5f,
  abstract     = {Clonogenic neural stem (NS) cell lines grown in adherent cultures have previously been established from embryonic stem cells and fetal and adult CNS in rodents and from human fetal brain and spinal cord. Here we describe the isolation of a new cell line from human fetal striatum (hNS cells). These cells showed properties of NS cells in vitro such as monolayer growth, high proliferation rate and expression of radial glia markers. The hNS cells expressed an early neuronal marker while being in the proliferative state. Under appropriate conditions, the hNS cells were efficiently differentiated to neurons, and after 4 weeks about 50% of the cells were III tubulin positive. They also expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and markers of neuronal subtypes, GABA, calbindin, and DARPP32. After intrastriatal implantation into newborn rats, the hNS cells survived and many of them migrated outside the transplant core into the surrounding tissue. A high percentage of cells in the grafts expressed the neuroblast marker DCX, indicating their neurogenic potential, and some of the cells differentiated to NeuN+ mature neurons. The human fetal striatum-derived NS cell line described here should be a useful tool for studies on cell replacement strategies in models of the striatal neuronal loss occurring in Huntington's disease and stroke.},
  author       = {Monni, Emanuela and Cusulin, Carlo and Cavallaro, Maurizio and Lindvall, Olle and Kokaia, Zaal},
  issn         = {2212-3946},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {338--346},
  publisher    = {Bentham Science Publishers},
  series       = {Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy},
  title        = {Human Fetal Striatum-Derived Neural Stem (NS) Cells Differentiate to Mature Neurons in Vitro and in Vivo.},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}