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Survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm born infants in relation to gestational age based on the last menstrual period or ultrasonographic examination

Simic, Marija; Amer-Wahlin, Isis; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Marsal, Karel LU and Källén, Karin LU (2014) In Journal of Perinatal Medicine 42(2). p.247-253
Abstract
Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of gestational age (GA) estimation on the basis of the last menstrual period (LMP) in comparison with GA based on ultrasound examination on rates of survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm infants. Methods: The Swedish national registry of infants born extremely preterm (Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study), including infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, was used to identify 645 infants with available information. Incidences of stillbirth, survival, small for GA (SGA), and major neonatal morbidity were calculated in relationship to the GA estimated by each of the approaches. Results: Pregnancies, in general, appeared to be longer when GA... (More)
Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of gestational age (GA) estimation on the basis of the last menstrual period (LMP) in comparison with GA based on ultrasound examination on rates of survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm infants. Methods: The Swedish national registry of infants born extremely preterm (Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study), including infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, was used to identify 645 infants with available information. Incidences of stillbirth, survival, small for GA (SGA), and major neonatal morbidity were calculated in relationship to the GA estimated by each of the approaches. Results: Pregnancies, in general, appeared to be longer when GA was estimated by LMP than by ultrasound (17.2% of the pregnancies were longer than 27 weeks). The incidences of stillbirth, neonatal death, and major neonatal morbidity in relationship to GA were similar for both groups. The risks for SGA were elevated when GA according to ultrasound examination was at least 7 days shorter than GA based on the LMP. Conclusions: In our cohort of infants born extremely preterm, estimation of GA on the basis of LMP indicated a longer pregnancy than estimated by ultrasound but did not influence the incidences of neonatal survival and morbidity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Extremely preterm infants, gestational age estimation, pregnancy, pregnancy dating, ultrasound
in
Journal of Perinatal Medicine
volume
42
issue
2
pages
247 - 253
publisher
De Gruyter
external identifiers
  • wos:000332843500014
  • scopus:84898627474
ISSN
1619-3997
DOI
10.1515/jpm-2013-0061
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5593ed45-945b-4572-8ac7-da708db1c6b7 (old id 4411089)
date added to LUP
2014-05-05 07:17:29
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:06:08
@article{5593ed45-945b-4572-8ac7-da708db1c6b7,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of gestational age (GA) estimation on the basis of the last menstrual period (LMP) in comparison with GA based on ultrasound examination on rates of survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm infants. Methods: The Swedish national registry of infants born extremely preterm (Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study), including infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, was used to identify 645 infants with available information. Incidences of stillbirth, survival, small for GA (SGA), and major neonatal morbidity were calculated in relationship to the GA estimated by each of the approaches. Results: Pregnancies, in general, appeared to be longer when GA was estimated by LMP than by ultrasound (17.2% of the pregnancies were longer than 27 weeks). The incidences of stillbirth, neonatal death, and major neonatal morbidity in relationship to GA were similar for both groups. The risks for SGA were elevated when GA according to ultrasound examination was at least 7 days shorter than GA based on the LMP. Conclusions: In our cohort of infants born extremely preterm, estimation of GA on the basis of LMP indicated a longer pregnancy than estimated by ultrasound but did not influence the incidences of neonatal survival and morbidity.},
  author       = {Simic, Marija and Amer-Wahlin, Isis and Lagercrantz, Hugo and Marsal, Karel and Källén, Karin},
  issn         = {1619-3997},
  keyword      = {Extremely preterm infants,gestational age estimation,pregnancy,pregnancy dating,ultrasound},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {247--253},
  publisher    = {De Gruyter},
  series       = {Journal of Perinatal Medicine},
  title        = {Survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm born infants in relation to gestational age based on the last menstrual period or ultrasonographic examination},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2013-0061},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2014},
}