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Two-pulse structured illumination imaging

Kristensson, Elias LU ; Berrocal, Edouard LU and Aldén, Marcus LU (2014) In Optics Letters 39(9). p.2584-2587
Abstract
Structured illumination (SI), which is an imaging technique that is employed in a variety of fields, permits unique possibilities to suppress unwanted signal contributions that carry misguiding information such as out-of-focus light or multiply scattered light. So far SI has been applied mostly for averaged imaging or for imaging of slowly occurring events because it requires three acquisitions (subimages) to construct the final SI image. This prerequisite puts technological constraints on SI that make "instantaneous" imaging of fast transient processes (occurring on sub-microsecond time scales) very challenging and expensive. Operating SI with fewer subimages generates errors in the form of residual lines that stretch across the image.... (More)
Structured illumination (SI), which is an imaging technique that is employed in a variety of fields, permits unique possibilities to suppress unwanted signal contributions that carry misguiding information such as out-of-focus light or multiply scattered light. So far SI has been applied mostly for averaged imaging or for imaging of slowly occurring events because it requires three acquisitions (subimages) to construct the final SI image. This prerequisite puts technological constraints on SI that make "instantaneous" imaging of fast transient processes (occurring on sub-microsecond time scales) very challenging and expensive. Operating SI with fewer subimages generates errors in the form of residual lines that stretch across the image. Here, a new approach that circumvents this limiting factor is presented and experimentally demonstrated. By judiciously choosing the intensity modulation, it is possible to extract an SI image from two subimages only. This development will allow standard double-pulsed lasers and interline transfer CCD or scientific CMOS cameras to be used to acquire temporally frozen SI images of rapidly occurring processes as well as to boost the frame-rate of current SI video systems; a technical advancement that will benefit both macro-and microscopic imaging applications. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Optics Letters
volume
39
issue
9
pages
2584 - 2587
publisher
Optical Society of America
external identifiers
  • wos:000335496400014
  • scopus:84899701923
ISSN
0146-9592
DOI
10.1364/OL.39.002584
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f09bc47b-d211-4c07-8fc0-757a035211c8 (old id 4470597)
date added to LUP
2014-06-19 13:18:30
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:01:12
@article{f09bc47b-d211-4c07-8fc0-757a035211c8,
  abstract     = {Structured illumination (SI), which is an imaging technique that is employed in a variety of fields, permits unique possibilities to suppress unwanted signal contributions that carry misguiding information such as out-of-focus light or multiply scattered light. So far SI has been applied mostly for averaged imaging or for imaging of slowly occurring events because it requires three acquisitions (subimages) to construct the final SI image. This prerequisite puts technological constraints on SI that make "instantaneous" imaging of fast transient processes (occurring on sub-microsecond time scales) very challenging and expensive. Operating SI with fewer subimages generates errors in the form of residual lines that stretch across the image. Here, a new approach that circumvents this limiting factor is presented and experimentally demonstrated. By judiciously choosing the intensity modulation, it is possible to extract an SI image from two subimages only. This development will allow standard double-pulsed lasers and interline transfer CCD or scientific CMOS cameras to be used to acquire temporally frozen SI images of rapidly occurring processes as well as to boost the frame-rate of current SI video systems; a technical advancement that will benefit both macro-and microscopic imaging applications. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America},
  author       = {Kristensson, Elias and Berrocal, Edouard and Aldén, Marcus},
  issn         = {0146-9592},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2584--2587},
  publisher    = {Optical Society of America},
  series       = {Optics Letters},
  title        = {Two-pulse structured illumination imaging},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.39.002584},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2014},
}