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Risk of Kaposi Sarcoma Among Immigrants to Sweden

Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2014) In Acta Dermato-Venereologica 94(4). p.476-477
Abstract
Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a locally aggressive endothelial tumour that is classified into 4 clinico-epidemiological forms: classic KS affecting lower limbs in elderly Mediterranean or East European men; endemic KS occurring in extremities among Equatorial African middle-aged men and children; iatrogenic KS involving lower limbs in immunosuppressive patients; and AIDS-associated (epidemic) KS observed among homo- and bisexual HIV-1-infected young men (1, 2). The world-wide epidemiology of KS has changed by spreading of HIV infection (1). For example, KS represented 7% of all cancers in Sub-Saharan African men in the 1960s, whereas in the 1980s the rate increased to 50%. Furthermore, the age distribution of KS has changed from elderly (in... (More)
Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a locally aggressive endothelial tumour that is classified into 4 clinico-epidemiological forms: classic KS affecting lower limbs in elderly Mediterranean or East European men; endemic KS occurring in extremities among Equatorial African middle-aged men and children; iatrogenic KS involving lower limbs in immunosuppressive patients; and AIDS-associated (epidemic) KS observed among homo- and bisexual HIV-1-infected young men (1, 2). The world-wide epidemiology of KS has changed by spreading of HIV infection (1). For example, KS represented 7% of all cancers in Sub-Saharan African men in the 1960s, whereas in the 1980s the rate increased to 50%. Furthermore, the age distribution of KS has changed from elderly (in classic form) to the late thirties (in epidemic form). KS is a rare tumour in Nordic countries; the incidence is 0.1-0.2/100,000 according to the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) report (3). According to this source, the rate in many Asian countries is <0.5/100,000, whereas African American men have a rate of 6.2/100,000. The highest rate is in men from Zimbabwe (52.2/100,000) (3). Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the recognised cause of all forms of KS (2). There is discrepancy between the prevalence of HHV-8 and KS incidence in some populations suggesting underreporting of KS or the existance of some unknown protective factors for KS (1). Migrant studies provide data on international differences in cancer rates (4). Furthermore, studies on immigrants may provide supplementary and confirmatory data on the incidence of cancer in countries without local cancer registries. A few available studies on immigrants have focused only on classic KS (5, 6). In the present study, we report mean age at diagnosis and KS rates by site in first-generation immigrants to Sweden. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Dermato-Venereologica
volume
94
issue
4
pages
476 - 477
publisher
Medical Journals Limited
external identifiers
  • wos:000339416100027
  • scopus:84902786881
ISSN
1651-2057
DOI
10.2340/00015555-1754
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
902d69f8-82f0-488f-a993-3f6f251cb9f7 (old id 4598813)
date added to LUP
2014-09-05 11:52:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:01:35
@article{902d69f8-82f0-488f-a993-3f6f251cb9f7,
  abstract     = {Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a locally aggressive endothelial tumour that is classified into 4 clinico-epidemiological forms: classic KS affecting lower limbs in elderly Mediterranean or East European men; endemic KS occurring in extremities among Equatorial African middle-aged men and children; iatrogenic KS involving lower limbs in immunosuppressive patients; and AIDS-associated (epidemic) KS observed among homo- and bisexual HIV-1-infected young men (1, 2). The world-wide epidemiology of KS has changed by spreading of HIV infection (1). For example, KS represented 7% of all cancers in Sub-Saharan African men in the 1960s, whereas in the 1980s the rate increased to 50%. Furthermore, the age distribution of KS has changed from elderly (in classic form) to the late thirties (in epidemic form). KS is a rare tumour in Nordic countries; the incidence is 0.1-0.2/100,000 according to the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) report (3). According to this source, the rate in many Asian countries is &lt;0.5/100,000, whereas African American men have a rate of 6.2/100,000. The highest rate is in men from Zimbabwe (52.2/100,000) (3). Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the recognised cause of all forms of KS (2). There is discrepancy between the prevalence of HHV-8 and KS incidence in some populations suggesting underreporting of KS or the existance of some unknown protective factors for KS (1). Migrant studies provide data on international differences in cancer rates (4). Furthermore, studies on immigrants may provide supplementary and confirmatory data on the incidence of cancer in countries without local cancer registries. A few available studies on immigrants have focused only on classic KS (5, 6). In the present study, we report mean age at diagnosis and KS rates by site in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.},
  author       = {Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1651-2057},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {476--477},
  publisher    = {Medical Journals Limited},
  series       = {Acta Dermato-Venereologica},
  title        = {Risk of Kaposi Sarcoma Among Immigrants to Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-1754},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2014},
}