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Developing an understanding of social norms and games : Emotional engagement, nonverbal agreement, and conversation

Brinck, Ingar LU (2014) In Theory & Psychology 24(6). p.737-754
Abstract
The first part of the article examines some recent studies on the early development of social norms that examine young children’s understanding of codified rule games. It is argued that the constitutive rules than define the games cannot be identified with social norms and therefore the studies provide limited evidence about socio-normative development. The second part reviews data on children’s play in natural settings that show that children do not understand norms as codified or rules of obligation, and that the norms that guide social interaction are dynamic, situated, and heterogeneous. It is argued that normativity is intersubjective and negotiable and starts to develop in the first year, emerging as a practical skill that depends on... (More)
The first part of the article examines some recent studies on the early development of social norms that examine young children’s understanding of codified rule games. It is argued that the constitutive rules than define the games cannot be identified with social norms and therefore the studies provide limited evidence about socio-normative development. The second part reviews data on children’s play in natural settings that show that children do not understand norms as codified or rules of obligation, and that the norms that guide social interaction are dynamic, situated, and heterogeneous. It is argued that normativity is intersubjective and negotiable and starts to develop in the first year, emerging as a practical skill that depends on participatory engagement. Three sources of compliance are discussed: emotional engagement, nonverbal agreement, and conversation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
compliance, constitutive rule, engagement, intersubjectivity, interaction, normative development, play, social norm
in
Theory & Psychology
volume
24
issue
6
pages
737 - 754
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000346578900001
  • scopus:84919632134
ISSN
1461-7447
DOI
10.1177/0959354314555792
project
Understanding rules: Cognitive and noncognitive models of social cognition
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
83fd247b-fa5f-4097-83dc-1fe7b4207461 (old id 4611769)
date added to LUP
2014-08-29 08:21:33
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:14:46
@article{83fd247b-fa5f-4097-83dc-1fe7b4207461,
  abstract     = {The first part of the article examines some recent studies on the early development of social norms that examine young children’s understanding of codified rule games. It is argued that the constitutive rules than define the games cannot be identified with social norms and therefore the studies provide limited evidence about socio-normative development. The second part reviews data on children’s play in natural settings that show that children do not understand norms as codified or rules of obligation, and that the norms that guide social interaction are dynamic, situated, and heterogeneous. It is argued that normativity is intersubjective and negotiable and starts to develop in the first year, emerging as a practical skill that depends on participatory engagement. Three sources of compliance are discussed: emotional engagement, nonverbal agreement, and conversation.},
  author       = {Brinck, Ingar},
  issn         = {1461-7447},
  keyword      = {compliance,constitutive rule,engagement,intersubjectivity,interaction,normative development,play,social norm},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {737--754},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Theory & Psychology},
  title        = {Developing an understanding of social norms and games : Emotional engagement, nonverbal agreement, and conversation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959354314555792},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2014},
}