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The brain-enriched microRNA miR-124 in plasma predicts neurological outcome after cardiac arrest

Gilje, Patrik LU ; Gidlöf, Olof LU ; Rundgren, Malin LU ; Cronberg, Tobias LU ; Al-Mashat, Mariam LU ; Olde, Björn LU ; Friberg, Hans LU and Erlinge, David LU (2014) In Critical Care 18(2).
Abstract
Introduction: Early prognostication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation is difficult, and there is a need for novel methods to estimate the extent of brain injury and predict outcome. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the cardiac arrest syndrome on the plasma levels of selected tissue-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and assessed their ability to prognosticate death and neurological disability. Methods: We included 65 patients treated with hypothermia after cardiac arrest in the study. Blood samples were obtained at 24 hours and at 48 hours. For miRNA-screening purposes, custom quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels were first used. Thereafter individual miRNAs were assessed at 48 hours with qPCR. miRNAs that... (More)
Introduction: Early prognostication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation is difficult, and there is a need for novel methods to estimate the extent of brain injury and predict outcome. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the cardiac arrest syndrome on the plasma levels of selected tissue-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and assessed their ability to prognosticate death and neurological disability. Methods: We included 65 patients treated with hypothermia after cardiac arrest in the study. Blood samples were obtained at 24 hours and at 48 hours. For miRNA-screening purposes, custom quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels were first used. Thereafter individual miRNAs were assessed at 48 hours with qPCR. miRNAs that successfully predicted prognosis at 48 hours were further analysed at 24 hours. Outcomes were measured according to the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after cardiac arrest and stratified into good (CPC score 1 or 2) or poor (CPC scores 3 to 5). Results: At 48 hours, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-208b, miR-21, miR-9 and miR-128 did not differ between the good and poor neurological outcome groups. In contrast, miR-124 was significantly elevated in patients with poor outcomes compared with those with favourable outcomes (P < 0.0001) at 24 hours and 48 hours after cardiac arrest. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves at 24 and 48 hours after cardiac arrest showed areas under the curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79 to 0.96) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.80 to 0.97), respectively. Conclusions: The brain-enriched miRNA miR-124 is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological prognosis following cardiac arrest. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Critical Care
volume
18
issue
2
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000339627400058
  • scopus:84897936514
ISSN
1364-8535
DOI
10.1186/cc13753
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b88b491-1050-4e96-b663-2be8cb2f2e7c (old id 4665595)
date added to LUP
2014-10-01 07:22:01
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:33:15
@article{1b88b491-1050-4e96-b663-2be8cb2f2e7c,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Early prognostication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation is difficult, and there is a need for novel methods to estimate the extent of brain injury and predict outcome. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the cardiac arrest syndrome on the plasma levels of selected tissue-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and assessed their ability to prognosticate death and neurological disability. Methods: We included 65 patients treated with hypothermia after cardiac arrest in the study. Blood samples were obtained at 24 hours and at 48 hours. For miRNA-screening purposes, custom quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels were first used. Thereafter individual miRNAs were assessed at 48 hours with qPCR. miRNAs that successfully predicted prognosis at 48 hours were further analysed at 24 hours. Outcomes were measured according to the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after cardiac arrest and stratified into good (CPC score 1 or 2) or poor (CPC scores 3 to 5). Results: At 48 hours, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-208b, miR-21, miR-9 and miR-128 did not differ between the good and poor neurological outcome groups. In contrast, miR-124 was significantly elevated in patients with poor outcomes compared with those with favourable outcomes (P &lt; 0.0001) at 24 hours and 48 hours after cardiac arrest. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves at 24 and 48 hours after cardiac arrest showed areas under the curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79 to 0.96) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.80 to 0.97), respectively. Conclusions: The brain-enriched miRNA miR-124 is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological prognosis following cardiac arrest.},
  articleno    = {R40},
  author       = {Gilje, Patrik and Gidlöf, Olof and Rundgren, Malin and Cronberg, Tobias and Al-Mashat, Mariam and Olde, Björn and Friberg, Hans and Erlinge, David},
  issn         = {1364-8535},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Critical Care},
  title        = {The brain-enriched microRNA miR-124 in plasma predicts neurological outcome after cardiac arrest},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/cc13753},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2014},
}