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High resolution scanning gate microscopy measurements on InAs/GaSb nanowire Esaki diode devices

Webb, James LU ; Persson, Olof LU ; Dick Thelander, Kimberly LU ; Thelander, Claes LU ; Timm, Rainer LU and Mikkelsen, Anders LU (2014) In Nano Reseach 7(6). p.877-887
Abstract
Gated transport measurements are the backbone of electrical characterization of nanoscale electronic devices. Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is one such gating technique that adds crucial spatial information, accessing the localized properties of semiconductor devices. Nanowires represent a central device concept due to the potential to combine very different materials. However, SGM on semiconductor nanowires has been limited to a resolution in the 50-100 nm range. Here, we present a study by SGM of newly developed III-V semiconductor nanowire InAs/GaSb heterojunction Esaki tunnel diode devices under ultra-high vacuum. Sub-5 nm resolution is demonstrated at room temperature via use of quartz resonator atomic force microscopy sensors, with... (More)
Gated transport measurements are the backbone of electrical characterization of nanoscale electronic devices. Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is one such gating technique that adds crucial spatial information, accessing the localized properties of semiconductor devices. Nanowires represent a central device concept due to the potential to combine very different materials. However, SGM on semiconductor nanowires has been limited to a resolution in the 50-100 nm range. Here, we present a study by SGM of newly developed III-V semiconductor nanowire InAs/GaSb heterojunction Esaki tunnel diode devices under ultra-high vacuum. Sub-5 nm resolution is demonstrated at room temperature via use of quartz resonator atomic force microscopy sensors, with the capability to resolve InAs nanowire facets, the InAs/GaSb tunnel diode transition and nanoscale defects on the device. We demonstrate that such measurements can rapidly give important insight into the device properties via use of a simplified physical model, without the requirement for extensive calculation of the electrostatics of the system. Interestingly, by precise spatial correlation of the device electrical transport properties and surface structure we show the position and existence of a very abrupt (<10 nm) electrical transition across the InAs/GaSb junction despite the change in material composition occurring only over 30-50 nm. The direct and simultaneous link between nanostructure composition and electrical properties helps set important limits for the precision in structural control needed to achieve desired device performance. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
nanowire, scanning gate microscopy, Esaki tunnel diode, InAs, GaSb, III-V, heterostructure
in
Nano Reseach
volume
7
issue
6
pages
877 - 887
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000339892000009
  • scopus:84902319847
ISSN
1998-0124
DOI
10.1007/s12274-014-0449-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
28ce09f3-7a63-486a-8583-197c4b2c559d (old id 4667913)
date added to LUP
2014-09-25 14:31:23
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:00:39
@article{28ce09f3-7a63-486a-8583-197c4b2c559d,
  abstract     = {Gated transport measurements are the backbone of electrical characterization of nanoscale electronic devices. Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is one such gating technique that adds crucial spatial information, accessing the localized properties of semiconductor devices. Nanowires represent a central device concept due to the potential to combine very different materials. However, SGM on semiconductor nanowires has been limited to a resolution in the 50-100 nm range. Here, we present a study by SGM of newly developed III-V semiconductor nanowire InAs/GaSb heterojunction Esaki tunnel diode devices under ultra-high vacuum. Sub-5 nm resolution is demonstrated at room temperature via use of quartz resonator atomic force microscopy sensors, with the capability to resolve InAs nanowire facets, the InAs/GaSb tunnel diode transition and nanoscale defects on the device. We demonstrate that such measurements can rapidly give important insight into the device properties via use of a simplified physical model, without the requirement for extensive calculation of the electrostatics of the system. Interestingly, by precise spatial correlation of the device electrical transport properties and surface structure we show the position and existence of a very abrupt (&lt;10 nm) electrical transition across the InAs/GaSb junction despite the change in material composition occurring only over 30-50 nm. The direct and simultaneous link between nanostructure composition and electrical properties helps set important limits for the precision in structural control needed to achieve desired device performance.},
  author       = {Webb, James and Persson, Olof and Dick Thelander, Kimberly and Thelander, Claes and Timm, Rainer and Mikkelsen, Anders},
  issn         = {1998-0124},
  keyword      = {nanowire,scanning gate microscopy,Esaki tunnel diode,InAs,GaSb,III-V,heterostructure},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {877--887},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Nano Reseach},
  title        = {High resolution scanning gate microscopy measurements on InAs/GaSb nanowire Esaki diode devices},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12274-014-0449-4},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2014},
}