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Avoiding procrastination and the planning fallacy : Implementing study-plans as a strategy to increase student achievement

Manninen, Satu LU and Wadsö-Lecaros, Cecilia LU (2015) Pedagogisk inspirationskonferens för HT-fakulteternas lärare 2014Pedagogisk inspirationskonferens för HT-fakulteternas lärare 2014 In Proceedings från Humanistiska och teologiska fakulteternas pedagogiska inspirationskonferens 2014
Abstract
Within a course in academic writing, first-term students of English currently construct individualized study-plans detailing both what they should do during the term and when they should do it. Students calculate the average workload for all their courses, and include in their study-plans all the hours they should spend both in and outside the classroom on each course, totalling in 40-hour working weeks. Students also regularly evaluate their progress and revise their study-plans in peer groups.



The reason why study-plans were introduced was the realization that many first-term students lack effective time-management skills and have difficulties comprehending what full-time study means. In courses where later work must... (More)
Within a course in academic writing, first-term students of English currently construct individualized study-plans detailing both what they should do during the term and when they should do it. Students calculate the average workload for all their courses, and include in their study-plans all the hours they should spend both in and outside the classroom on each course, totalling in 40-hour working weeks. Students also regularly evaluate their progress and revise their study-plans in peer groups.



The reason why study-plans were introduced was the realization that many first-term students lack effective time-management skills and have difficulties comprehending what full-time study means. In courses where later work must build on work done at an earlier stage, the ability to plan for time is essential; the tendency among students to continuously underestimate the time each task would take created serious problems.



Research shows that poor time-management skills, procrastinatory behaviour and the planning fallacy (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979) result in lower academic performance, higher dropout rates and stress (Brownshow & Reasinger, 2000; Sigall & Kruglanski, 2000). It is therefore important that such problems be addressed early. Instead of assuming that first-term students already know how to manage their time, these skills should be actively taught to them. That, in turn, can help avoid problems that affect courses with little classroom teaching and where students need to work independently and respect several deadlines.



The results of our experiment with study-plans are promising: students report that they have gained a better insight into how they spend their time, in what areas they procrastinate, and how discussing their study-plans can be helpful. We also discuss how teaching students basic time-management and other skills can lead to more in-depth learning: students who can plan their studies are more focussed on course content, can foresee upcoming difficulties and know how to handle them. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
planning fallacy, procrastination, time-management skills, study skills, study plans
categories
Higher Education
in
Proceedings från Humanistiska och teologiska fakulteternas pedagogiska inspirationskonferens 2014
editor
Maurits, Alexander and Mårtensson, Katarina
publisher
Humanistiska och teologiska fakulteterna, Lunds universitet
conference name
Pedagogisk inspirationskonferens för HT-fakulteternas lärare 2014Pedagogisk inspirationskonferens för HT-fakulteternas lärare 2014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0bb4fa94-0926-45b5-b6f7-6a788c122dd7 (old id 4882720)
date added to LUP
2014-09-25 14:06:59
date last changed
2016-08-29 16:07:08
@inproceedings{0bb4fa94-0926-45b5-b6f7-6a788c122dd7,
  abstract     = {Within a course in academic writing, first-term students of English currently construct individualized study-plans detailing both what they should do during the term and when they should do it. Students calculate the average workload for all their courses, and include in their study-plans all the hours they should spend both in and outside the classroom on each course, totalling in 40-hour working weeks. Students also regularly evaluate their progress and revise their study-plans in peer groups.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The reason why study-plans were introduced was the realization that many first-term students lack effective time-management skills and have difficulties comprehending what full-time study means. In courses where later work must build on work done at an earlier stage, the ability to plan for time is essential; the tendency among students to continuously underestimate the time each task would take created serious problems. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Research shows that poor time-management skills, procrastinatory behaviour and the planning fallacy (Kahneman &amp; Tversky, 1979) result in lower academic performance, higher dropout rates and stress (Brownshow &amp; Reasinger, 2000; Sigall &amp; Kruglanski, 2000). It is therefore important that such problems be addressed early. Instead of assuming that first-term students already know how to manage their time, these skills should be actively taught to them. That, in turn, can help avoid problems that affect courses with little classroom teaching and where students need to work independently and respect several deadlines.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The results of our experiment with study-plans are promising: students report that they have gained a better insight into how they spend their time, in what areas they procrastinate, and how discussing their study-plans can be helpful. We also discuss how teaching students basic time-management and other skills can lead to more in-depth learning: students who can plan their studies are more focussed on course content, can foresee upcoming difficulties and know how to handle them.},
  author       = {Manninen, Satu and Wadsö-Lecaros, Cecilia},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings från Humanistiska och teologiska fakulteternas pedagogiska inspirationskonferens 2014},
  editor       = {Maurits, Alexander and Mårtensson, Katarina},
  keyword      = {planning fallacy,procrastination,time-management skills,study skills,study plans},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Humanistiska och teologiska fakulteterna, Lunds universitet},
  title        = {Avoiding procrastination and the planning fallacy : Implementing study-plans as a strategy to increase student achievement},
  year         = {2015},
}