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Effects of Physical Exercise on Neuroinflammation, Neuroplasticity, Neurodegeneration, and Behavior: What We Can Learn From Animal Models in Clinical Settings.

Svensson, Martina LU ; Lexell, Jan LU and Deierborg, Tomas LU (2015) In Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair 29(6). p.577-589
Abstract
Physical exercise is a cornerstone in the management of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, and stroke. However, much of its beneficial effects on improving motor functions and cognition as well as decreasing neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are not yet well understood. The obvious limitations of studying the protective mechanisms behind exercise, for example, brain plasticity and neurodegeneration, could be overcome by generating novel animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In this narrative review, we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise performed in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders and how the results from animal studies can be used in clinical settings. From... (More)
Physical exercise is a cornerstone in the management of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, and stroke. However, much of its beneficial effects on improving motor functions and cognition as well as decreasing neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are not yet well understood. The obvious limitations of studying the protective mechanisms behind exercise, for example, brain plasticity and neurodegeneration, could be overcome by generating novel animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In this narrative review, we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise performed in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders and how the results from animal studies can be used in clinical settings. From preclinical studies, the positive effects of exercise have been related to increased levels of neurotrophic factors, elevated expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated microglia. It is clear that parameters influencing the effect of exercise, such as intensity, still remain to be investigated in animal studies in order to find the optimal program that can be translated into exercise interventions for patients with neurodegenerative diseases. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
volume
29
issue
6
pages
577 - 589
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:25527485
  • wos:000358313600009
  • scopus:84936941104
ISSN
1552-6844
DOI
10.1177/1545968314562108
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ece2747-c5c1-4a97-aefc-5a4878b9fb30 (old id 4905942)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25527485?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-01-11 20:00:41
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:07:21
@article{6ece2747-c5c1-4a97-aefc-5a4878b9fb30,
  abstract     = {Physical exercise is a cornerstone in the management of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, and stroke. However, much of its beneficial effects on improving motor functions and cognition as well as decreasing neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are not yet well understood. The obvious limitations of studying the protective mechanisms behind exercise, for example, brain plasticity and neurodegeneration, could be overcome by generating novel animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In this narrative review, we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise performed in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders and how the results from animal studies can be used in clinical settings. From preclinical studies, the positive effects of exercise have been related to increased levels of neurotrophic factors, elevated expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated microglia. It is clear that parameters influencing the effect of exercise, such as intensity, still remain to be investigated in animal studies in order to find the optimal program that can be translated into exercise interventions for patients with neurodegenerative diseases.},
  author       = {Svensson, Martina and Lexell, Jan and Deierborg, Tomas},
  issn         = {1552-6844},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {577--589},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair},
  title        = {Effects of Physical Exercise on Neuroinflammation, Neuroplasticity, Neurodegeneration, and Behavior: What We Can Learn From Animal Models in Clinical Settings.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1545968314562108},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2015},
}