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Altered video task : a non-verbal measure of what-who-where recall in young children

Bobrowicz, Katarzyna LU and Haman, Maciej (2017) In Behaviour and Information Technology
Abstract
This report aims to introduce, test and discuss a new method of measuring episodic memory in participants with highly restricted verbal abilities. Although an elicited/deferred imitation paradigm has already proposed a successful method of measuring this capacity in infants as young as 6 months old [Bauer, Patricia J. 2006. “Constructing a Past in Infancy: A Neuro-Developmental Account.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4): 175–181], it failed to include a measure of capacities crucial for episodic recall, that is: a sense of self, a sense of subjective time and autonoetic consciousness [Tulving, Endel. 2002. “Episodic Memory: From Mind to Brain.” Annual Reviews Psychology 53: 1–25]. We combined developmental and comparative approaches in... (More)
This report aims to introduce, test and discuss a new method of measuring episodic memory in participants with highly restricted verbal abilities. Although an elicited/deferred imitation paradigm has already proposed a successful method of measuring this capacity in infants as young as 6 months old [Bauer, Patricia J. 2006. “Constructing a Past in Infancy: A Neuro-Developmental Account.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4): 175–181], it failed to include a measure of capacities crucial for episodic recall, that is: a sense of self, a sense of subjective time and autonoetic consciousness [Tulving, Endel. 2002. “Episodic Memory: From Mind to Brain.” Annual Reviews Psychology 53: 1–25]. We combined developmental and comparative approaches in the altered video task to allow for simultaneous measuring of episodic recall and autonoetic consciousness. Episodic recall was measured via presentation of non-modified and modified recordings of a personal past event after a 24-h delay. The 15-month-old infants were expected to watch the modified video significantly longer than the non-modified video, and so evince the differentiation between them. Alongside, the infants participated in a mirror-mark task (a standard measure of self-recognition) and in a real-time video task (a possible alternative for the mirror-mark task). Results for ‘what’ and ‘who’ were consistent with our expectations. All results, their implications and possible future directions are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Episodic memory, self-recognition, altered video task, imitation, Tulving, Bauer
in
Behaviour and Information Technology
pages
16 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85027495231
ISSN
0144-929X
DOI
10.1080/0144929X.2017.1364422
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a221f92-6eac-49e8-816c-98c742e997a2
date added to LUP
2017-08-16 22:43:42
date last changed
2017-09-10 05:22:58
@article{4a221f92-6eac-49e8-816c-98c742e997a2,
  abstract     = {This report aims to introduce, test and discuss a new method of measuring episodic memory in participants with highly restricted verbal abilities. Although an elicited/deferred imitation paradigm has already proposed a successful method of measuring this capacity in infants as young as 6 months old [Bauer, Patricia J. 2006. “Constructing a Past in Infancy: A Neuro-Developmental Account.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4): 175–181], it failed to include a measure of capacities crucial for episodic recall, that is: a sense of self, a sense of subjective time and autonoetic consciousness [Tulving, Endel. 2002. “Episodic Memory: From Mind to Brain.” Annual Reviews Psychology 53: 1–25]. We combined developmental and comparative approaches in the altered video task to allow for simultaneous measuring of episodic recall and autonoetic consciousness. Episodic recall was measured via presentation of non-modified and modified recordings of a personal past event after a 24-h delay. The 15-month-old infants were expected to watch the modified video significantly longer than the non-modified video, and so evince the differentiation between them. Alongside, the infants participated in a mirror-mark task (a standard measure of self-recognition) and in a real-time video task (a possible alternative for the mirror-mark task). Results for ‘what’ and ‘who’ were consistent with our expectations. All results, their implications and possible future directions are discussed.},
  author       = {Bobrowicz, Katarzyna and Haman, Maciej},
  issn         = {0144-929X},
  keyword      = {Episodic memory,self-recognition,altered video task, imitation,Tulving,Bauer},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {16},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Behaviour and Information Technology},
  title        = {Altered video task : a non-verbal measure of what-who-where recall in young children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144929X.2017.1364422},
  year         = {2017},
}