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Lung cancer in young women in southern Sweden : A descriptive study

Fritz, Ildikó LU and Olsson, Håkan LU (2018) In Clinical Respiratory Journal 12(4). p.1565-1571
Abstract

Introduction: Lung cancer, a common malignancy and cause of cancer-related deaths, is strongly linked to several environmental exposures, and thus primarily affects the elderly. Formerly a man's disease, its incidence is rising among women, and lung cancer is now more common in women than men in Sweden. Women are particularly over-represented among young patients. While overall cancer mortality in Europe is decreasing, female lung cancer mortality is increasing. Objectives: We describe the epidemiological presentation of lung cancer in young Swedish women, aiming to pinpoint its risk factors for young women. Methods: 1159 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer in southern Sweden 1997-2015 answered questionnaires on their lifestyles and... (More)

Introduction: Lung cancer, a common malignancy and cause of cancer-related deaths, is strongly linked to several environmental exposures, and thus primarily affects the elderly. Formerly a man's disease, its incidence is rising among women, and lung cancer is now more common in women than men in Sweden. Women are particularly over-represented among young patients. While overall cancer mortality in Europe is decreasing, female lung cancer mortality is increasing. Objectives: We describe the epidemiological presentation of lung cancer in young Swedish women, aiming to pinpoint its risk factors for young women. Methods: 1159 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer in southern Sweden 1997-2015 answered questionnaires on their lifestyles and personal and family medical histories. We identified those below age 50. Results: 70 (6.0%) of 1159 women were below age 50. Most (n = 49, 70.0%) were aged 45-50; eight (11.4%) were below age 40. The most common lung cancer subtype was adenocarcinoma (n = 33, 47.1%). 12.9% (n = 9) had carcinoid tumors. Most women reported both first- and second-hand tobacco smoke exposure (n = 54, 77.1%); 2.9% (n = 2) reported neither. 17.1% (n = 12) were never-smokers. 34.3% (n = 24) reported frequent X-ray radiation exposure. 78.6% reported at least one near relative with cancer. 25.7% reported relatives with lung cancer. Conclusions: Lung cancer remains rare in young women, and tobacco smoke exposure is the single greatest risk factor, even for never-smokers. Thus, avoiding tobacco smoke exposure remains the most important preventive measure against lung cancer for young women in Sweden and elsewhere.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, female, lung neoplasms, tobacco smoke pollution
in
Clinical Respiratory Journal
volume
12
issue
4
pages
7 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85045121918
ISSN
1752-6981
DOI
10.1111/crj.12712
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a87d1bf-6ae2-4171-ac1f-26980e419eda
date added to LUP
2018-04-19 14:08:21
date last changed
2019-01-06 13:51:52
@article{4a87d1bf-6ae2-4171-ac1f-26980e419eda,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Lung cancer, a common malignancy and cause of cancer-related deaths, is strongly linked to several environmental exposures, and thus primarily affects the elderly. Formerly a man's disease, its incidence is rising among women, and lung cancer is now more common in women than men in Sweden. Women are particularly over-represented among young patients. While overall cancer mortality in Europe is decreasing, female lung cancer mortality is increasing. Objectives: We describe the epidemiological presentation of lung cancer in young Swedish women, aiming to pinpoint its risk factors for young women. Methods: 1159 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer in southern Sweden 1997-2015 answered questionnaires on their lifestyles and personal and family medical histories. We identified those below age 50. Results: 70 (6.0%) of 1159 women were below age 50. Most (n = 49, 70.0%) were aged 45-50; eight (11.4%) were below age 40. The most common lung cancer subtype was adenocarcinoma (n = 33, 47.1%). 12.9% (n = 9) had carcinoid tumors. Most women reported both first- and second-hand tobacco smoke exposure (n = 54, 77.1%); 2.9% (n = 2) reported neither. 17.1% (n = 12) were never-smokers. 34.3% (n = 24) reported frequent X-ray radiation exposure. 78.6% reported at least one near relative with cancer. 25.7% reported relatives with lung cancer. Conclusions: Lung cancer remains rare in young women, and tobacco smoke exposure is the single greatest risk factor, even for never-smokers. Thus, avoiding tobacco smoke exposure remains the most important preventive measure against lung cancer for young women in Sweden and elsewhere.</p>},
  author       = {Fritz, Ildikó and Olsson, Håkan},
  issn         = {1752-6981},
  keyword      = {epidemiology,female,lung neoplasms,tobacco smoke pollution},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1565--1571},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clinical Respiratory Journal},
  title        = {Lung cancer in young women in southern Sweden : A descriptive study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/crj.12712},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2018},
}