Advanced

Iranian and Swedish adolescents: differences in personality traits and well-being

Kjell, Oscar LU ; Nima, Ali A.; Sikström, Sverker LU ; Archer, Trevor and Garcia, Danilo (2013) In PeerJ 1.
Abstract
Introduction. This study addresses the need to further contextualize research on well-being (e.g., Kjell, 2011) in terms of cross-cultural aspects of personality traits among adolescents and by examining two different conceptualizations of well-being: subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) and psychological well-being (i.e., positive relations with others, environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, personal growth, and life purpose).



Methods. Iranian (N = 122, mean age 15.23 years) and Swedish (N = 109, mean age 16.69 years) adolescents were asked to fill out a Big Five personality test, as well as questionnaires assessing subjective well-being and psychological... (More)
Introduction. This study addresses the need to further contextualize research on well-being (e.g., Kjell, 2011) in terms of cross-cultural aspects of personality traits among adolescents and by examining two different conceptualizations of well-being: subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) and psychological well-being (i.e., positive relations with others, environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, personal growth, and life purpose).



Methods. Iranian (N = 122, mean age 15.23 years) and Swedish (N = 109, mean age 16.69 years) adolescents were asked to fill out a Big Five personality test, as well as questionnaires assessing subjective well-being and psychological well-being.



Results. Swedes reported higher subjective and psychological well-being, while Iranians reported higher degree of Agreeableness, Openness and Conscientiousness. Neuroticism and Extraversion did not differ between cultures. Neuroticism was related to well-being within both cultures. Openness was related to well-being only among Iranians, and Extraversion only among Swedes. A mediation analysis within the Swedish sample, the only sample meeting statistical criteria for mediation analysis to be conducted, demonstrated that psychological well-being mediated the relationship between Neuroticism and subjective well-being as well as between Extraversion and subjective well-being.



Conclusions. Certain personality traits, such as Extraversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness, relate differently to well-being measures across cultures. Meanwhile, Neuroticism seems to relate similarly across cultures at least with regard to subjective well-being. Furthermore, the results give an indication on how psychological well-being might mediate the relationship between certain personality traits and subjective well-being. Overall, the complexity of the results illustrates the need for more research whilst supporting the importance of contextualizing well-being research. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Personality traits, Big Five, Subjective well-being, Psychological well-being, Adolescence, Cross-cultural, Iran, Sweden
in
PeerJ
volume
1
publisher
PeerJ
external identifiers
  • pmid:24255812
  • scopus:84888356044
  • wos:000209191100001
ISSN
2167-8359
DOI
10.7717/peerj.197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d75a6c1-5337-46bc-a266-2abb4c00e3a7 (old id 4145602)
date added to LUP
2013-11-07 17:19:20
date last changed
2019-04-23 02:48:49
@article{4d75a6c1-5337-46bc-a266-2abb4c00e3a7,
  abstract     = {Introduction. This study addresses the need to further contextualize research on well-being (e.g., Kjell, 2011) in terms of cross-cultural aspects of personality traits among adolescents and by examining two different conceptualizations of well-being: subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) and psychological well-being (i.e., positive relations with others, environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, personal growth, and life purpose).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods. Iranian (N = 122, mean age 15.23 years) and Swedish (N = 109, mean age 16.69 years) adolescents were asked to fill out a Big Five personality test, as well as questionnaires assessing subjective well-being and psychological well-being.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results. Swedes reported higher subjective and psychological well-being, while Iranians reported higher degree of Agreeableness, Openness and Conscientiousness. Neuroticism and Extraversion did not differ between cultures. Neuroticism was related to well-being within both cultures. Openness was related to well-being only among Iranians, and Extraversion only among Swedes. A mediation analysis within the Swedish sample, the only sample meeting statistical criteria for mediation analysis to be conducted, demonstrated that psychological well-being mediated the relationship between Neuroticism and subjective well-being as well as between Extraversion and subjective well-being.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions. Certain personality traits, such as Extraversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness, relate differently to well-being measures across cultures. Meanwhile, Neuroticism seems to relate similarly across cultures at least with regard to subjective well-being. Furthermore, the results give an indication on how psychological well-being might mediate the relationship between certain personality traits and subjective well-being. Overall, the complexity of the results illustrates the need for more research whilst supporting the importance of contextualizing well-being research.},
  articleno    = {e197},
  author       = {Kjell, Oscar and Nima, Ali A. and Sikström, Sverker and Archer, Trevor and Garcia, Danilo},
  issn         = {2167-8359},
  keyword      = {Personality traits,Big Five,Subjective well-being,Psychological well-being,Adolescence,Cross-cultural,Iran,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {PeerJ},
  series       = {PeerJ},
  title        = {Iranian and Swedish adolescents: differences in personality traits and well-being},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.197},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2013},
}