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Multimodal interaction in the insect brain

Balkenius, Anna and Balkenius, Christian LU (2016) In BMC Neuroscience 17.
Abstract
Background
The magnitude of multimodal enhancement in the brain is believed to depend on the stimulus intensity and timing. Such an effect has been found in many species, but has not been previously investigated in insects.

Results
We investigated the responses to multimodal stimuli consisting of an odour and a colour in the antennal lobe and mushroom body of the moth Manduca sexta. The mushroom body shows enhanced responses for multimodal stimuli consisting of a general flower odour and a blue colour. No such effect was seen for a bergamot odour. The enhancement shows an inverse effectiveness where the responses to weaker multimodal stimuli are amplified more than those to stronger stimuli. Furthermore, the enhancement... (More)
Background
The magnitude of multimodal enhancement in the brain is believed to depend on the stimulus intensity and timing. Such an effect has been found in many species, but has not been previously investigated in insects.

Results
We investigated the responses to multimodal stimuli consisting of an odour and a colour in the antennal lobe and mushroom body of the moth Manduca sexta. The mushroom body shows enhanced responses for multimodal stimuli consisting of a general flower odour and a blue colour. No such effect was seen for a bergamot odour. The enhancement shows an inverse effectiveness where the responses to weaker multimodal stimuli are amplified more than those to stronger stimuli. Furthermore, the enhancement depends on the precise timing of the two stimulus components.

Conclusions
Insect multimodal processing show both the principle of inverse effectiveness and the existence of an optimal temporal window. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Moth, Multmodal interaction, Inverse effeciveness, Superadditivity, Temporal window
in
BMC Neuroscience
volume
17
pages
9 pages
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:84971571569
  • wos:000376956600001
ISSN
1471-2202
DOI
10.1186/s12868-016-0258-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
501b0b39-6fd9-40ad-9a57-7a30c67de82d
date added to LUP
2016-11-08 21:18:30
date last changed
2017-11-14 09:50:21
@article{501b0b39-6fd9-40ad-9a57-7a30c67de82d,
  abstract     = {Background<br/>The magnitude of multimodal enhancement in the brain is believed to depend on the stimulus intensity and timing. Such an effect has been found in many species, but has not been previously investigated in insects.<br/><br/>Results<br/>We investigated the responses to multimodal stimuli consisting of an odour and a colour in the antennal lobe and mushroom body of the moth Manduca sexta. The mushroom body shows enhanced responses for multimodal stimuli consisting of a general flower odour and a blue colour. No such effect was seen for a bergamot odour. The enhancement shows an inverse effectiveness where the responses to weaker multimodal stimuli are amplified more than those to stronger stimuli. Furthermore, the enhancement depends on the precise timing of the two stimulus components.<br/><br/>Conclusions<br/>Insect multimodal processing show both the principle of inverse effectiveness and the existence of an optimal temporal window.},
  articleno    = {29},
  author       = {Balkenius, Anna and Balkenius, Christian},
  issn         = {1471-2202},
  keyword      = {Moth,Multmodal interaction,Inverse effeciveness,Superadditivity,Temporal window},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Neuroscience},
  title        = {Multimodal interaction in the insect brain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12868-016-0258-7},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2016},
}