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12-month outcome and predictors of recurrence in psychiatric treatment of depression – a retrospective study.

Johansson, Olof LU ; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU and Bjärehed, Jonas LU (2015) In Psychiatric Quarterly 86(3). p.407-417
Abstract
Many individuals treated for depression suffer relapse or recurrence after treatment. Known risk factors include number of previous depressive episodes and residual symptoms after treatment. Both relapse/recurrence rates and predictors of relapse/recurrence, however, may differ between various settings. To perform a naturalistic evaluation of the sustained effectiveness of treatment for adult clinical depression in a psychiatric out-patient setting and to examine psychosocial and clinical predictors of relapse/recurrence. 51 individuals, who were successfully treated/discharged from psychiatric care 12 months prior, were assessed regarding current depressive status and regarding relapse and recurrence. Logistic regression was used to... (More)
Many individuals treated for depression suffer relapse or recurrence after treatment. Known risk factors include number of previous depressive episodes and residual symptoms after treatment. Both relapse/recurrence rates and predictors of relapse/recurrence, however, may differ between various settings. To perform a naturalistic evaluation of the sustained effectiveness of treatment for adult clinical depression in a psychiatric out-patient setting and to examine psychosocial and clinical predictors of relapse/recurrence. 51 individuals, who were successfully treated/discharged from psychiatric care 12 months prior, were assessed regarding current depressive status and regarding relapse and recurrence. Logistic regression was used to assess the predictive impact of the variables measured. At the 12-month follow-up, 26 % of the participants were in complete remission, 45 % were in partial remission, and 29 % were clinically depressed. In 1 year, 61 % suffered a new depressive episode. Having a greater number of previous episodes and having no partner significantly increased the risk of relapse or recurrence. A high prevalence of depression and partially remitted depression is reported at 12-month follow up, and a large proportion of the sample would likely benefit from active treatment. Relapse/recurrence rates are higher in this study than in many other studies, and it may be hypothesized that they are generally higher in psychiatric settings than in primary care. If so, this would indicate the need for a different treatment strategy in the psychiatric care of depression, with emphasis on long-term management of depression. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
depression, recurrence, psychiatry, follow-up
in
Psychiatric Quarterly
volume
86
issue
3
pages
407 - 417
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:25597030
  • wos:000360193400012
  • scopus:84940437510
ISSN
0033-2720
DOI
10.1007/s11126-015-9341-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f754d657-3af3-4149-9d5b-b4991e4bdba2 (old id 5046721)
date added to LUP
2015-02-12 12:42:56
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:18:20
@article{f754d657-3af3-4149-9d5b-b4991e4bdba2,
  abstract     = {Many individuals treated for depression suffer relapse or recurrence after treatment. Known risk factors include number of previous depressive episodes and residual symptoms after treatment. Both relapse/recurrence rates and predictors of relapse/recurrence, however, may differ between various settings. To perform a naturalistic evaluation of the sustained effectiveness of treatment for adult clinical depression in a psychiatric out-patient setting and to examine psychosocial and clinical predictors of relapse/recurrence. 51 individuals, who were successfully treated/discharged from psychiatric care 12 months prior, were assessed regarding current depressive status and regarding relapse and recurrence. Logistic regression was used to assess the predictive impact of the variables measured. At the 12-month follow-up, 26 % of the participants were in complete remission, 45 % were in partial remission, and 29 % were clinically depressed. In 1 year, 61 % suffered a new depressive episode. Having a greater number of previous episodes and having no partner significantly increased the risk of relapse or recurrence. A high prevalence of depression and partially remitted depression is reported at 12-month follow up, and a large proportion of the sample would likely benefit from active treatment. Relapse/recurrence rates are higher in this study than in many other studies, and it may be hypothesized that they are generally higher in psychiatric settings than in primary care. If so, this would indicate the need for a different treatment strategy in the psychiatric care of depression, with emphasis on long-term management of depression.},
  author       = {Johansson, Olof and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Bjärehed, Jonas},
  issn         = {0033-2720},
  keyword      = {depression,recurrence,psychiatry,follow-up},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {407--417},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Psychiatric Quarterly},
  title        = {12-month outcome and predictors of recurrence in psychiatric treatment of depression – a retrospective study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11126-015-9341-y},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2015},
}