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Serum level of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein is lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in non-scoliotic controls

Gerdhem, P.; Topalis, C.; Grauers, A.; Stubendorff, J.; Ohlin, Acke LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2015) In European Spine Journal 24(2). p.256-261
Abstract
The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown, but growth is a risk factor for progression. Growth pattern differs in children with and without scoliosis. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) may be associated with scoliosis and growth. We, therefore, studied COMP in children with and without idiopathic scoliosis. We included 105 children, with mean age 14.4 years (range 10-16), under observation or treatment for idiopathic scoliosis, and 103 children from an age-matched population-based cohort. COMP was measured in serum at the time of inclusion. Growth velocity was estimated from repeated height measurements. T tests, analysis of covariance or linear regression were used for statistical comparisons. COMP was mean (SD) 11 (5)... (More)
The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown, but growth is a risk factor for progression. Growth pattern differs in children with and without scoliosis. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) may be associated with scoliosis and growth. We, therefore, studied COMP in children with and without idiopathic scoliosis. We included 105 children, with mean age 14.4 years (range 10-16), under observation or treatment for idiopathic scoliosis, and 103 children from an age-matched population-based cohort. COMP was measured in serum at the time of inclusion. Growth velocity was estimated from repeated height measurements. T tests, analysis of covariance or linear regression were used for statistical comparisons. COMP was mean (SD) 11 (5) units/liter (U/L) in children with scoliosis and 13 (5) U/L in the control cohort (p = 0.005, adjusted for sex and sampling time of the day). When patients and controls were analyzed together, high COMP was correlated with high growth velocity (beta = 0.19, p = 0.003). When patients and controls were analyzed separately, COMP was correlated with growth velocity in children with scoliosis (beta = 0.27, p = 0.007), but not in children without scoliosis (beta = 0.02, p = 0.83) (all analyses adjusted for age, sex and sampling time). Low COMP was significantly correlated with large curve size in children with scoliosis (beta = -0.29, p = 0.003), but not after adjustment for age, sex and sampling time (beta = -0.16; p = 0.14). COMP was lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in a control cohort. In children with scoliosis, high COMP was modestly correlated with high growth velocity, but not with curve severity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, Idiopathic scoliosis, Children, Growth velocity
in
European Spine Journal
volume
24
issue
2
pages
256 - 261
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000349437200008
  • scopus:84925503599
ISSN
0940-6719
DOI
10.1007/s00586-014-3691-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
72c7d743-173a-4fa8-acdb-01a7a840e948 (old id 5175995)
date added to LUP
2015-03-25 13:45:22
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:29:23
@article{72c7d743-173a-4fa8-acdb-01a7a840e948,
  abstract     = {The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown, but growth is a risk factor for progression. Growth pattern differs in children with and without scoliosis. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) may be associated with scoliosis and growth. We, therefore, studied COMP in children with and without idiopathic scoliosis. We included 105 children, with mean age 14.4 years (range 10-16), under observation or treatment for idiopathic scoliosis, and 103 children from an age-matched population-based cohort. COMP was measured in serum at the time of inclusion. Growth velocity was estimated from repeated height measurements. T tests, analysis of covariance or linear regression were used for statistical comparisons. COMP was mean (SD) 11 (5) units/liter (U/L) in children with scoliosis and 13 (5) U/L in the control cohort (p = 0.005, adjusted for sex and sampling time of the day). When patients and controls were analyzed together, high COMP was correlated with high growth velocity (beta = 0.19, p = 0.003). When patients and controls were analyzed separately, COMP was correlated with growth velocity in children with scoliosis (beta = 0.27, p = 0.007), but not in children without scoliosis (beta = 0.02, p = 0.83) (all analyses adjusted for age, sex and sampling time). Low COMP was significantly correlated with large curve size in children with scoliosis (beta = -0.29, p = 0.003), but not after adjustment for age, sex and sampling time (beta = -0.16; p = 0.14). COMP was lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in a control cohort. In children with scoliosis, high COMP was modestly correlated with high growth velocity, but not with curve severity.},
  author       = {Gerdhem, P. and Topalis, C. and Grauers, A. and Stubendorff, J. and Ohlin, Acke and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {0940-6719},
  keyword      = {Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein,Idiopathic scoliosis,Children,Growth velocity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {256--261},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Spine Journal},
  title        = {Serum level of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein is lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in non-scoliotic controls},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-014-3691-2},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2015},
}