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Child healthcare nurses believe that bilingual children show slower language development, simplify screening procedures and delay referrals

Nayeb, Laleh; Wallby, Thomas; Westerlund, Monica; Salameh, Eva-Kristina LU and Sarkadi, Anna (2015) In Acta Pædiatrica 104(2). p.198-205
Abstract
AimA significant number of children living in Sweden are bilingual, but how language screening is performed in this group is unknown. We investigated child healthcare nurses' perceptions of the language screening of bilingual children aged 30-36months, together with their clinical practices. MethodsAn online questionnaire was completed by 863 nurses who performed language screening of bilingual children in Sweden at least once a month, corresponding to 89% of the target population. Cox regression identified predictors of the nurses' tendency to simplify the screening of bilingual children. ResultsThe nurses reported a greater lack of confidence and more difficulties in interpreting screening outcomes for bilingual than monolingual children... (More)
AimA significant number of children living in Sweden are bilingual, but how language screening is performed in this group is unknown. We investigated child healthcare nurses' perceptions of the language screening of bilingual children aged 30-36months, together with their clinical practices. MethodsAn online questionnaire was completed by 863 nurses who performed language screening of bilingual children in Sweden at least once a month, corresponding to 89% of the target population. Cox regression identified predictors of the nurses' tendency to simplify the screening of bilingual children. ResultsThe nurses reported a greater lack of confidence and more difficulties in interpreting screening outcomes for bilingual than monolingual children (p<0.001). Half of the nurses simplified the screening processes for bilingual children and 74% postponed referrals to speech and language services, basing these adaptations on their perceptions of the children's Swedish language skills (p<0.001). Most nurses (82%) believed that language development was slower in bilingual children, and this was the strongest predictor of simplified screening practices (RR=2.00, 95% CI 1.44-2.77). ConclusionChild healthcare nurses need easily accessible information and clear guidelines on the language development of bilingual children to ensure that bilingual and monolingual children receive equitable language screening services. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bilingual, Child health nurses, Child healthcare, Language development, Screening
in
Acta Pædiatrica
volume
104
issue
2
pages
198 - 205
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000348731000026
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/apa.12834
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5b08758d-388d-4423-ac43-1a6de8c33f9f (old id 5187068)
date added to LUP
2015-04-01 07:33:33
date last changed
2016-09-20 04:33:16
@article{5b08758d-388d-4423-ac43-1a6de8c33f9f,
  abstract     = {AimA significant number of children living in Sweden are bilingual, but how language screening is performed in this group is unknown. We investigated child healthcare nurses' perceptions of the language screening of bilingual children aged 30-36months, together with their clinical practices. MethodsAn online questionnaire was completed by 863 nurses who performed language screening of bilingual children in Sweden at least once a month, corresponding to 89% of the target population. Cox regression identified predictors of the nurses' tendency to simplify the screening of bilingual children. ResultsThe nurses reported a greater lack of confidence and more difficulties in interpreting screening outcomes for bilingual than monolingual children (p&lt;0.001). Half of the nurses simplified the screening processes for bilingual children and 74% postponed referrals to speech and language services, basing these adaptations on their perceptions of the children's Swedish language skills (p&lt;0.001). Most nurses (82%) believed that language development was slower in bilingual children, and this was the strongest predictor of simplified screening practices (RR=2.00, 95% CI 1.44-2.77). ConclusionChild healthcare nurses need easily accessible information and clear guidelines on the language development of bilingual children to ensure that bilingual and monolingual children receive equitable language screening services.},
  author       = {Nayeb, Laleh and Wallby, Thomas and Westerlund, Monica and Salameh, Eva-Kristina and Sarkadi, Anna},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  keyword      = {Bilingual,Child health nurses,Child healthcare,Language development,Screening},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {198--205},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Pædiatrica},
  title        = {Child healthcare nurses believe that bilingual children show slower language development, simplify screening procedures and delay referrals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.12834},
  volume       = {104},
  year         = {2015},
}