Advanced

Physiological restitution after night-call duty in anaesthesiologists: impact on metabolic factors.

Malmberg, Birgitta LU ; Persson, Roger LU ; Jönsson, Bo A LU ; Ekström, Eva LU ; Flisberg, Per LU ; Ranklev Twetman, Eva LU and Örbaek, Palle LU (2007) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 51. p.823-830
Abstract
Background: Several studies have shown impaired mental well-being and performance in physicians work on call, but knowledge of the physiological effects is scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate if there was a metabolic stress response in the restitutional phase after night-call duty, indicating potential negative health effects, and determine whether there were differences between physician specialities. Methods: Anaesthesiologists (n = 19) were compared with paediatricians/ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeons (n = 18). On an ordinary workday, 1 and 3 days after work on night call, blood samples were taken for analysis of glucose, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine, testosterone, insulin growth factor-1... (More)
Background: Several studies have shown impaired mental well-being and performance in physicians work on call, but knowledge of the physiological effects is scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate if there was a metabolic stress response in the restitutional phase after night-call duty, indicating potential negative health effects, and determine whether there were differences between physician specialities. Methods: Anaesthesiologists (n = 19) were compared with paediatricians/ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeons (n = 18). On an ordinary workday, 1 and 3 days after work on night call, blood samples were taken for analysis of glucose, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine, testosterone, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and LDL), triglycerids (TG) and insulin. Saliva cortisol was sampled on an ordinary working day, a day including 16-h night call, the third day following, and for anaesthesiologists also on a day off work. Results: TSH differed significantly between days in both groups, with a 26% lower level 1 day after on-call duty (P < 0.001). A 48% cortisol rise in the morning preceding night duty was found for paediatricians/ENT surgeons (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The significant dip in TSH level 24 h after night-call duty indicates a metabolic effect of working on night call and should be studied further. However, the levels were within the normal range and the overall results do not imply any serious metabolic changes and only minor differences were seen between specialist groups. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
51
pages
823 - 830
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000248042800005
  • scopus:34447335318
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01350.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eeaec680-7f5c-4af4-a4d4-79b178ac16f1 (old id 539716)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17578458&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-04 14:32:31
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:57:36
@article{eeaec680-7f5c-4af4-a4d4-79b178ac16f1,
  abstract     = {Background: Several studies have shown impaired mental well-being and performance in physicians work on call, but knowledge of the physiological effects is scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate if there was a metabolic stress response in the restitutional phase after night-call duty, indicating potential negative health effects, and determine whether there were differences between physician specialities. Methods: Anaesthesiologists (n = 19) were compared with paediatricians/ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeons (n = 18). On an ordinary workday, 1 and 3 days after work on night call, blood samples were taken for analysis of glucose, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine, testosterone, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and LDL), triglycerids (TG) and insulin. Saliva cortisol was sampled on an ordinary working day, a day including 16-h night call, the third day following, and for anaesthesiologists also on a day off work. Results: TSH differed significantly between days in both groups, with a 26% lower level 1 day after on-call duty (P &lt; 0.001). A 48% cortisol rise in the morning preceding night duty was found for paediatricians/ENT surgeons (P &lt; 0.01). Conclusion: The significant dip in TSH level 24 h after night-call duty indicates a metabolic effect of working on night call and should be studied further. However, the levels were within the normal range and the overall results do not imply any serious metabolic changes and only minor differences were seen between specialist groups.},
  author       = {Malmberg, Birgitta and Persson, Roger and Jönsson, Bo A and Ekström, Eva and Flisberg, Per and Ranklev Twetman, Eva and Örbaek, Palle},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {823--830},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Physiological restitution after night-call duty in anaesthesiologists: impact on metabolic factors.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01350.x},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2007},
}