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Simulation of a design of a lab scale Radio frequency heating unit of hamburgers

Rayner, Marilyn LU and Tornberg, Eva LU (2006) In Proceecing of the 52nd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology 86-TU. p.467-469
Abstract
With regard to efficient food processing and cost effective production lines, Radio Frequency (RF) heating is a prime example. Thermal processing of food has gained an ever growing importance as food manufactures strive after increasing the number and quality of value added products on the market. Solid food, such as meat and vegetables, is more difficult to heat efficiently since it cannot be pumped or stirred. This is an area where RF cooking can provide significant benefits due to the volumetric nature of dielectric heating. Since heat is generated internally in the product, by inducing an electric field through the food, which acts as a dielectric material, and does not rely on conduction, convection or radiation, heating takes place... (More)
With regard to efficient food processing and cost effective production lines, Radio Frequency (RF) heating is a prime example. Thermal processing of food has gained an ever growing importance as food manufactures strive after increasing the number and quality of value added products on the market. Solid food, such as meat and vegetables, is more difficult to heat efficiently since it cannot be pumped or stirred. This is an area where RF cooking can provide significant benefits due to the volumetric nature of dielectric heating. Since heat is generated internally in the product, by inducing an electric field through the food, which acts as a dielectric material, and does not rely on conduction, convection or radiation, heating takes place evenly in the product without temperature gradients. RF is also superior to micro-wave heating in this respect as the wave can penetrate food items up to several meters in diameter whereas the penetration is limited to a few centimeters at micro-wave frequencies. This means that there are no hot-spots, cold-spots or overcooking of surfaces and the total time is significantly reduced and losses are minimized. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceecing of the 52nd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology
volume
86-TU
pages
467 - 469
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
284b4e2b-52a3-4763-af99-cc7fec8bfe23 (old id 540398)
date added to LUP
2007-09-24 16:48:33
date last changed
2016-04-16 12:04:54
@inproceedings{284b4e2b-52a3-4763-af99-cc7fec8bfe23,
  abstract     = {With regard to efficient food processing and cost effective production lines, Radio Frequency (RF) heating is a prime example. Thermal processing of food has gained an ever growing importance as food manufactures strive after increasing the number and quality of value added products on the market. Solid food, such as meat and vegetables, is more difficult to heat efficiently since it cannot be pumped or stirred. This is an area where RF cooking can provide significant benefits due to the volumetric nature of dielectric heating. Since heat is generated internally in the product, by inducing an electric field through the food, which acts as a dielectric material, and does not rely on conduction, convection or radiation, heating takes place evenly in the product without temperature gradients. RF is also superior to micro-wave heating in this respect as the wave can penetrate food items up to several meters in diameter whereas the penetration is limited to a few centimeters at micro-wave frequencies. This means that there are no hot-spots, cold-spots or overcooking of surfaces and the total time is significantly reduced and losses are minimized.},
  author       = {Rayner, Marilyn and Tornberg, Eva},
  booktitle    = {Proceecing of the 52nd International Congress of Meat Science and Technology},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {467--469},
  title        = {Simulation of a design of a lab scale Radio frequency heating unit of hamburgers},
  volume       = {86-TU},
  year         = {2006},
}